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Sunday, July 22, 2018

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2918. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1950. Annual Report. Id Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #280.
T: hay yields, economics

2221. Goldstein, Walter A.. 1986. Alternative crops, rotations, and management systems for dryland farming.. Ph.D. dissertation, Agronomy and Soils, WSU.
This work covers a number of research areas, including the use of edible white lupine as an alternative crop, the use of black medic in rotation with spring peas and winter wheat (the PALS concept), performance of winter wheat as influenced by rotations, fertilization, and fumigation; rotational effects of medics; wheat interference with weeds; costs and returns of alternative systems; comparison of agronomic effects of conventional, organic, and biodynamic management. The PALS (perpetuating alternative legume system) concept was field-tested using a pea + medic - medic GM - winter wheat rotation with limited inputs of agrichemicals and tillage. This system was more economic using market prices of commodities at both a low and high yield level. With government support prices, the PALS system was competitive in the low yield situation, but not the high. Rotational effects appeared to suppress weeds in wheat with the medic compared to a continuous cereal system.

5539. Ramig, R.E.. 1987. Conservation tillage systems for green pea production in the Pacific Northwest.. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems. p. 93-94.
Summarizes a 13 yr study of the effects of 4 tillage systems in a pea-winter wheat cropping system on water conservation and use, yields, water use efficiency, and the changes in weed populations. Water storage on land on which wheat stubble was left standing overwinter averaged 10% more than on fall-tilled stubble. There were no significant differences in wheat yields among tillage systems. Weed infestations in peas shifted due to tillage, primarily with lambsquarters. Spring plow was worst. Conservation tillage for a wheat-pea rotation can enhance water conservation, and in dry years can increase pea yields by 20% and wheat yields by 5%. Long-term effects are not consistent due to crop residue influences.

7028. USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1955. Joint Utah - Idaho Conservation Dryland Farming Guide.. .
Describes 3 basic rotations for the region: 1) grass/alfalfa - no more than 2 yr grain (Class IV land, precip. >17"); 2) grain - fallow - various rotations with alfalfa/grass or sweetclover depending on precip. (12-17"); 3) permanent grass/legume, with no more than 2 yr grain (precip 9-12", Class IV land); lists adapted grass and legume varieties; describes use of rotary hoe and skew treader for weed control. T: grass varieties.

7488. Wells, G.J.. 1970. Skeleton weed (Chondrilla juncea) on the Victorian Mallee: 2. Effect of legumes on soil fertility, subsequent wheat crop and weed population.. Aust. J. Exp. Agric. Anim. Husb., 10:622-629.
This experiment has shown that, although wheat crops grown on skeleton weed infested land will give economic responses to applied nitrogen in seasons of adequate rainfall, the financial returns are likely to be much lower than if lucerne were included in the rotation. Therefore, sowing lucerne on arable land infested with the weed is not only a practical means of weed control, but also sound management, since it improves pasture production, soil fertility, and subsequent wheat yields on some of the poorest soil types in the Mallee.

7994. Stewart, V.R., L.S> Prestbye, T.K. Keener, and L.E. Welty. 1986. Weed control in sod-seeded alfalfa.. Montana AgResearch 3(1):21-24.

8001. Stewart, V.R., L.E. Welty, and P.F. Hensleigh. 1979. Evaluation of glyphosate in combination with various herbicides for sod-seeding.. West. Soc. Weed Sci. Abstr. p. 110.

9894. Cramer, C.. 1987. Water saving 'weed' replaces chem-fallow.. The New Farm, Sept/Oct 1987, p. 28-29..
Black medic is successfully being used in Montana as a reseeding annual legume in dryland rotations. The medic is protecting the soil from erosion, improving soil structure and water-holding capacity, disrupting weed and disease cycles, and reducing saline seep. Becauce medic is a shallow-rooted legume, it is supplying the soil with added nitrogen but only drawing water from the top 2 feet of the soil profile. This moisture is replaced by snow melt. The medic can also be a profitable hay crop.

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