WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, October 21, 2018

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9884. DeVault, G.. 1987. Whipping weeds, naturally.. The New Farm, May/June 1987, p. 36-37..
Instead of chemicals, a 3,000 acre dryland grain farm in Montana, uses crop rotation and timely cultivation to control weeds. After spring rains, they go over the fields with a chisel plow and rod weeder. At planting time, minimal weeding is done again with chisel-rod weeder. They summer fallow and alternate wheat and feed grains every third year and seed clover with spring-seeded grains. They have also reduced row spacing from 10 inches to 7 inches.

9894. Cramer, C.. 1987. Water saving 'weed' replaces chem-fallow.. The New Farm, Sept/Oct 1987, p. 28-29..
Black medic is successfully being used in Montana as a reseeding annual legume in dryland rotations. The medic is protecting the soil from erosion, improving soil structure and water-holding capacity, disrupting weed and disease cycles, and reducing saline seep. Becauce medic is a shallow-rooted legume, it is supplying the soil with added nitrogen but only drawing water from the top 2 feet of the soil profile. This moisture is replaced by snow melt. The medic can also be a profitable hay crop.

11048. Kirschenmann, Fred. 1992. Eradicating field bindweed: tillage, rotation knock out weed.. Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society Newsletter, Jan. 1992, p. 5..
A complex rotation combined with timely tillage has been successful in controlling field bindweed and Canada thistle on a North Dakota farm. A five year rotation of oats/sweetclover-sweetclover green manure-spring wheat-buckwheat-winter rye has worked well.

11204. Matheson, N., B. Rusmore, J.R. Sims, M. Spengler, and E.L. Michalson. 1991. Cereal-legume cropping systems: nine farm case studies in the dryland northern plains, Canadian prairies, and intermountain Northwest.. AERO, 44 N. Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59601.
The farm case studies presented in this book include details of the crop rotations, tillage, fertilization, and pest control practices used by the farms. Farms were chosen for their innovative or alternative practices. Partial budgets for each crop on each farm are presented to provide a reference point for the economic performance of alternative dryland cropping systems. Comparisons with more conventional systems are not made.

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