WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Friday, July 20, 2018

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2918. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1950. Annual Report. Id Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #280.
T: hay yields, economics

11204. Matheson, N., B. Rusmore, J.R. Sims, M. Spengler, and E.L. Michalson. 1991. Cereal-legume cropping systems: nine farm case studies in the dryland northern plains, Canadian prairies, and intermountain Northwest.. AERO, 44 N. Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59601.
The farm case studies presented in this book include details of the crop rotations, tillage, fertilization, and pest control practices used by the farms. Farms were chosen for their innovative or alternative practices. Partial budgets for each crop on each farm are presented to provide a reference point for the economic performance of alternative dryland cropping systems. Comparisons with more conventional systems are not made.

11346. Boerboom, C. and F.L. Young. 1991. Integrated crop management for cereal/legume production in the Palouse.. Technical Report 91-3, Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State Univ., Pullman.
This report summarizes six years of a field-scale integrated crop management experiment near Pullman, WA. The study focused on weed management intensity, residue levels for conservation compliance, and economic returns. Two crop rotations, two tillage systems, and three weed management levels were used. Plant diseases, insect pests, soil microbiota and earthworms were also monitored. The study will continue several more years. It took about four years for each treatment to stabilize, pointing out the need for long-term studies. Over time, the three year rotation with conservation tillage appeared most profitable and in compliance with residue levels. The low weed management level was seldom justified by weed control, yield, or profitability considerations. Moderate to high weed management were often the most profitable, although a reduction in the soil reserve of weed seeds with high management might allow periods of less intensive management in the future.

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