WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

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Search results on 10/16/18

3036. Swan, D.G., M.M. Oveson, and A.P. Appleby. 1974. Chemical and cultural methods for downy brome control and yield of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 49:793-795.

3278. Parish, S.. 1990. A review of non-chemical weed control techniques.. Bio. Agric. and Hort. 7:117-137..
This paper discusses non-chemical weed control techniques for cereal and row crop production. Recommendations include a good rotation scheme, delayed sowing of winter wheat to avoid autumn weeds, and a cereal variety with long straw and an initially prostrate growth habit to smother weeds. Other techniques to smother weeds include increasing the seeding rate by up to 20%, sowing cereal in bands, and undersowing with mustard in areas where winter is severe enough to kill the mustard. A thin-tined implement can be used for pre- and post emergence operations and blind harrowing, just before crop emerges. Combine modifications were recommended in order to separate the weed seeds from the grain, straw and chaff to avoid returning weed seeds to the soil. Biological control in the form of natural enemies of weeds is currently being researched and appears very successful.

9884. DeVault, G.. 1987. Whipping weeds, naturally.. The New Farm, May/June 1987, p. 36-37..
Instead of chemicals, a 3,000 acre dryland grain farm in Montana, uses crop rotation and timely cultivation to control weeds. After spring rains, they go over the fields with a chisel plow and rod weeder. At planting time, minimal weeding is done again with chisel-rod weeder. They summer fallow and alternate wheat and feed grains every third year and seed clover with spring-seeded grains. They have also reduced row spacing from 10 inches to 7 inches.

9894. Cramer, C.. 1987. Water saving 'weed' replaces chem-fallow.. The New Farm, Sept/Oct 1987, p. 28-29..
Black medic is successfully being used in Montana as a reseeding annual legume in dryland rotations. The medic is protecting the soil from erosion, improving soil structure and water-holding capacity, disrupting weed and disease cycles, and reducing saline seep. Becauce medic is a shallow-rooted legume, it is supplying the soil with added nitrogen but only drawing water from the top 2 feet of the soil profile. This moisture is replaced by snow melt. The medic can also be a profitable hay crop.

10020. Koscelny, J.A., T.F. Peeper, J.B. Solie, and S.G. Solomon. 1990. Effect of wheat (Triticum aestivum) row spacing, seeding rate, and cultivar on yield loss from cheat (Bromus secalinus).. Weed Technology 4:487-492.
Field experiments were conducted in Oklahoma to detemine the effects of row spacing, cultivar, seeding rate and water or ammonium fertilizer injection in the row at seeding, on the competitiveness of hard red winter wheat with cheatgrass. All treatments were planted with either weed-free wheat or cheat-infested wheat seed. Decreasing row spacing from 23 to 8 cm increased yield of weed-free wheat at two of three locations and cheat-infested wheat in six of ten experiments. Increasing seeding rate from 265 to 530 seeds/m increased wheat yield. Injecting water at 20 ml/m of row at seeding did not increase wheat emergence or yield. Cheat seed production was not consistently suppressed by any one cultivar.

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