WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, February 18, 2019

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: weed WA legumes

Use a different search term

Search results on 02/18/19

2221. Goldstein, Walter A.. 1986. Alternative crops, rotations, and management systems for dryland farming.. Ph.D. dissertation, Agronomy and Soils, WSU.
This work covers a number of research areas, including the use of edible white lupine as an alternative crop, the use of black medic in rotation with spring peas and winter wheat (the PALS concept), performance of winter wheat as influenced by rotations, fertilization, and fumigation; rotational effects of medics; wheat interference with weeds; costs and returns of alternative systems; comparison of agronomic effects of conventional, organic, and biodynamic management. The PALS (perpetuating alternative legume system) concept was field-tested using a pea + medic - medic GM - winter wheat rotation with limited inputs of agrichemicals and tillage. This system was more economic using market prices of commodities at both a low and high yield level. With government support prices, the PALS system was competitive in the low yield situation, but not the high. Rotational effects appeared to suppress weeds in wheat with the medic compared to a continuous cereal system.

5539. Ramig, R.E.. 1987. Conservation tillage systems for green pea production in the Pacific Northwest.. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems. p. 93-94.
Summarizes a 13 yr study of the effects of 4 tillage systems in a pea-winter wheat cropping system on water conservation and use, yields, water use efficiency, and the changes in weed populations. Water storage on land on which wheat stubble was left standing overwinter averaged 10% more than on fall-tilled stubble. There were no significant differences in wheat yields among tillage systems. Weed infestations in peas shifted due to tillage, primarily with lambsquarters. Spring plow was worst. Conservation tillage for a wheat-pea rotation can enhance water conservation, and in dry years can increase pea yields by 20% and wheat yields by 5%. Long-term effects are not consistent due to crop residue influences.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us