WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Saturday, October 20, 2018

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661. Barnes, O.K. and D.W. Bohmont. 1958. Effect of cropping practices on water intake rates in the northern Great Plains.. WY Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 358.
The rate of water absorbed by the soil was evaluated on bare fallow, trashy fallow, and grassland. Total absorbed water in one hour was 1.55, 2.80, and 2.11 inches for the respective covers. The water intake rate at one hour was 0.3 in/hr for bare fallow and 2.26 in/hr for trashy fallow. Water intake rates associated with other tillage practices are also presented in this bulletin.

5253. Pikul, J.L. Jr., J.F. Zuzel and R.N. Greenwalt. 1988. Tillage impacts on water infiltration.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 827, p.46.

7672. Wysocki, D.. 1989. Improving water infiltration in frozen soil.. STEEP Conservation Farming Update, Summer 1989, p.13-14..
Compared fall chisel versus standing stubble for water infiltration at 3 dates. No difference in July following harvest, much lower infiltration with stubble in December with 5" frost depth, no difference (low infiltration) in January with 14" frost depth. For chisel tillage to be effective, chisel marks must be open to the surface, and chisel fracturing should penetrate below the frost depth. Deeper chiseling at wider spacing, or subsoiling, may be an option.

7826. Zuzel, J.F., J.L. Pikul, and P.E. Rasmussen. 1990. Tillage and fertilizer effects on water infiltration.. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 54:205-208.
Tillage and fertilization practices affect water infiltration. A long-term study at Pendleton, OR compared three tillages (plow, disk, and sweep) since 1940, and two rates of N (45 and 180 kg/ha) since 1962. Infiltration rates for plow, disk, and sweep were 17, 14, and 16 mm/h, respectively. Rates for the low and high nitrogen were 9 and 22 mm/h respectively. Results also indicate that surface sealing and soil frost are probably more important than tillage pans for infiltration. Residue cover eliminates any tillage effect on infiltration, while fertility is important in producing more crop biomass.

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