WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Thursday, October 18, 2018

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Search results on 10/18/18

7434. Walter, D.T.. 1987. Early studies on the use of legumes for conservation tillage in Nebraska.. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems. p. 9-10.
Describes early research beginning in the 1930s. Surface residues, especially alfalfa, improved soil structure and infiltration. Erosion and runoff from dense, subtilled legume plots was minimal compared to oat or wheat stubble. Sweetclover and alfalfa were the principal legumes. Erosion and excess N mineralization were problems with sweetclover. Subtilling legume residues retarded decomposition and nitrification, increased earthworm casts, and enhanced aggregate stability. When sweetclover decomposed on the surface, 5-10 lb N/ac were lost as NH3, with only a trace lost when residue was plowed under.

11146. Rasmussen, V.P. and R.L. Newhall. 1991. Dryland tillage demonstration/research (FSA compliance) plots.. Agri-hint Series 91-108, Coop. Ext., Utah State Univ., Logan.
Chem-fallow systems showed better profitability and lower soil loss than conventional systems. A deep furrow drill did not perform as well as a Yield no-till drill.

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