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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

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5362. Power, J.F. (ed.). 1987. The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems.. Soil Cons. Soc. Amer., Ankeny, IA. 153 pp..
Proceedings of a national conference, University of Georgia, Athens, April 27-29, 1987. Excellent reference for the use of legumes in cropping systems and their compatibility with conservation tillage. Major sections include: the need; germplasm resources; nitrogen source; insects and diseases; cropping practices; weed control; erosion and productivity; economics.

743. Bell, M.A.. 1937. The effect of tillage method, crop sequence and date of seeding upon the yield and quality of dryland cereals and other crops in north-central MT.. MT Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #336.
T: Climatic data. Yield X crop, tillage, rotation. Green manure effects.

754. Bennett, W., D. Pittman, D. Tingey, D. McAllister, H. Peterson, and I. Sampson. 1954. Fifty years of dry land research (at the Nephi Field Station).. Utah Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 371.
Summarizes the results of 50 yr of research at the Nephi Field Station in cental Utah. Discusses climate - spring rainfall crucial, fall emergence of wheat correlated to high yields. Ave. annual precipitation is 12.65 in. Tillage experiments - fall verus spring plowing did not affect yields, while late spring plowing lowered yields. Plowing to 8" depth increased yields by 8% compared to plowing at 5". Yields were higher with plowing and no further cultivation on fallow (weeds controlled) than with normal fallow tillage. Yields were poor with stubble mulch. Fertility: A pea green manure increased wheat yields both in the short and long term. Wheat yields were sometimes depressed by green manure, due to moisture shortage or N immobilization. Manure application increased wheat yields in all treatments, and was more beneficial in wet years. N fertilizer increased wheat yields and protein. Burning straw increased yields for 30 yr, then they began to decline. No response to P. Wheat-fallow gave the greatest yields and net returns, and wheat was the only crop distinctly benefitted by summerfallow. Alfalfa depressed the following wheat yields but improved soil fertility. Continuous wheat yielded less than 40% of wheat-fallow. Wheatgrasses showed potential for forage and seed. Spring wheats yielded 60% of winter wheat. Only 32% of rainfall was stored as soil moisture in summerfallow. Overall, yields were low (15-25 bu/ac) and treatment differences were small (1-3 bu). These results predate the semidwarf wheat varieties.

1819. Elliott, L.F. (ed.). 1987. STEEP - Conservation concepts and accomplishments.. Washington State Univ. Publ., 662pp..
A compilation of 48 papers covering: tillage and plant maagement; erosion and runoff predictions; plant design; pest management; socio-economic; integrated systems; technology transfer for cropping systems; 22 technical notes. T: many

1773. Durst, L., G. Kahnt and E. Kubler. 1988. Effects of preceeding "break crops" on winter wheat and influence of cultural practices.. J. Agron. Crop. Sci., 160:239-249.
After the break crops wheat yield decreased within a range of 4 dt/ha as follows: alfalfa-beans-rape/clover-grass/maize. Raising N-fertilization hardly allowed to improve the value of break crops. The manner of primary tillage exerted stronger influence on the yield than the level of N-fertilization. Using the rotary tiller, at beginning of growth there may be calculated on 15% higher NO3-values and/or higher N-mineralization or N-transformation. Eyespot disease could not be prevented sufficiently and purposefully by another break crop, N-fertilization or primary tillage. Recurrent rotavating suppressed weeds less than ploughing.

1854. Emmond, G.S.. 1971. Effect of rotations, tillage treatment and fertilizers on the aggregation of a clay soil.. Canadian J. Soil Science, 51:235-241.
Soil aggregation was lowest in a wheat-fallow rotation and increased in other fallow-grain rotations with the second, third and forth crops after the fallow year. The best aggregation was under continuous wheat. Rotations containing hay crops increased aggregation significantly. Tillage treatments affected soil aggregation in the following order: green manure crop plowed under> cultivated with trash cover> crop residue plowed under > cultivated with crop residue burned off = crop residue disked in. Fertilizer (11-48-0) increased aggregation except where crop residue had been removed. Barn manure increased soil aggregation. T: Effect of barn manure and crop sequence on soil aggregation. Effect of 5 tillage treatments on soil aggregation.

2211. Goldstein, Walter. 1989. Thoughts on drought-proofing your farm: a biodynamic approach. Working paper No. 2, Michael Fields Agr. Institute.
Describes the influence of soil aggregate size on moisture retention and crop growth. Discusses the benefits of perennial grasses in the rotation to improve soil structure. Discusses management of sweetclover for grazing and green manure. Discusses stubble mulch tillage.

2597. Herrman, T. and M.V. Wiese. 1984. Foot rot control in winter wheat using tillage, rotation, variety, fungicide, and nitrogen variables.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #737.
Worst infection with conventional tillage; Stephens a more resistant variety; 3 yr rotation had lowest level, also lower levels with peas versus lentils; fungicides increased yields 4-6 bu/ac; no effect of level of N fertilizer; evidence from other areas that green manure could reduce infection levels; late fall tillage reduces infection; reduced tillage intensifies other diseases such as Cephalosporium stripe and Fusarium root rot. T: disease incidence by tillage, variety, fungicide.

3107. Dormaar, J.F. and C.W. Lindwall. 1989. Chemical differences in dark brown chernozemic Ap horizons under various conservation tillage systems.. Can. J. Soil Sci. 69:481-488.
Soil properties were investigated in two long-term studies: a 19 yr study of till vs. no-till in wheat fallow, and a 9 yr study of till vs. no-till with 3 rotations, including continuous cropping. No-till had the predominant influence on improving various soil physical and microbial properties. There was little difference in continuous cropping versus wheat-fallow, with tillage. The study compared soil from the entire plow depth, and concluded that 19 yr was long enough for the entire Ap horizon to benefit from no-till. No-till in both studies led to 40% of the dry aggregates being >0.84 mm. Dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities were twice as high under no-till as under cultivatiion. No-till also led to the largest monosaccharide accumulation in the soil.

4798. Nelson, A.L.. 1930. Methods of spring wheat tillage.. WY Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 173.
No spring wheat yield benefit was realized from having winter rye or peas as green manure in the rotation over 17 years. Some years it was observed that the green manure had not begun to decay a year after plowdown. For the first five years of the study, the pea green manure in rotation was superior to fallow preceding spring wheat. A 3-year rotation study found spring wheat to yield 23% more following dry beans compared to corn.

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