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Friday, May 25, 2018

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1095. Brown, D.B., D. McCool, R. Papendick, and L. McDonough. 1985. Herbicide residues from winter wheat plots: effect of tillage and crop management.. J. Environ. Science 14:521-532.
Studied the magnitude and persistence of residues of metribuzin and bromoxynil octanoate in winter wheat plots under various tillage management. Herbicide loss was greatest where erosion was high. Herbicide runoff was extended under winter conditions in eastern WA, and there was little movement or degradation of herbicides when the ground was frozen. The half life of metribuzin was 102-112 days.

1360. Cochran, V.L., L.F. Elliott, and R.I. Papendick. 1982. Effect of crop residue management and tillage on water use efficiency and yield of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 74:929-932.

2597. Herrman, T. and M.V. Wiese. 1984. Foot rot control in winter wheat using tillage, rotation, variety, fungicide, and nitrogen variables.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #737.
Worst infection with conventional tillage; Stephens a more resistant variety; 3 yr rotation had lowest level, also lower levels with peas versus lentils; fungicides increased yields 4-6 bu/ac; no effect of level of N fertilizer; evidence from other areas that green manure could reduce infection levels; late fall tillage reduces infection; reduced tillage intensifies other diseases such as Cephalosporium stripe and Fusarium root rot. T: disease incidence by tillage, variety, fungicide.

4086. Massee, T.W. and H. McKay. 1979. Improving dryland wheat production in eastern Idaho with tillage. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #581.
Stubble increased snowcatch and wheat yields; fall chiseling increased water infiltration and wheat yields; burning straw decreased yields after 6 yrs; row seeding a response up to 50 lb/ac N; research done at Tetonia; early fall seeding gave highest potential yield, but more disease and weed problems; annual cropping is possible when stored soil moisture exceeds 3 1/3 feet. T: tillage X moisture, yields

6359. Smiley, R., D. Wilkins, W. Uddin, S. Ott, K. Rhinhart, and S. Case. 1989. Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat and barley.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 840, p. 68-79..
Rhizoctonia root rot is now considered the most severe root disease of barley in the PNW. It is more important than take-all and Pythium on wheat produced in drier areas (<16" precip.). Based on long-term plots at Pendleton, different management systems are unlikely to greatly influence the biological resistance of soils to Rhizoctonia. Rotational crops susceptible to Rhizoctonia include wheat, barley, peas, chickpeas, lentils, and rapeseed. The disease is less apparent on small grains after legumes than after cereals. Rhizoctonia damage is always highest on no-till systems, but yields may not suffer due to improved water relations under conservation tillage. Australian research indicates that applications of N and P fertilizers can reduce the disease. There appear to be detrimental herbicide interactions with Rhizoctonia, particularly Glean on high pH soils. Also, the use of glyphosate increased disease incidence, perhaps by signalling the pathogens to move from the dying plants to newly seeded ones. A delay of at least 2 weeks is suggested between chem kill and planting of a new crop.

11067. Cook, R.J. and J.T. Waldher. 1977. Influence of stubble-mulch residue management on Cercosporella foot rot and yields of winter wheat.. Plant Disease Reporter 61:96-100.
The stubble-mulch method of residue management at Pullman, WA, did not favor more Cercosporella foot rot than the moldboard plow method. Foot rot was generally less severe on wheat in stubble-mulched plots, apparently because of poorer wheat growth already in early fall. This poorer wheat growth in certain years was not corrected by benomyl application. In general, Cercosporella severity was directly proportional to plant size and vigor in the fall, regardless of tillage method.

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