WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, March 18, 2018


Browse on keywords: organic matter green manure

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Search results on 03/18/18

2406. Hanley, Paul (ed.). 1980. Earthcare: Ecological agriculture in Saskatchewan.. Earthcare Information Centre.
A well-written text covering all aspects of biological farming in the prairie region of Saskatchewan. Practices apply to small and large farms. Includes reports from selected farms. References at the end of chapters.

2607. Hilander, S. (ed.). 1989. Proceedings of AERO's soil building cropping systems conference. December 7-9, Lewistown, MT. AERO, 44 N. Last Chance Gulch #9, Helena, MT 59601.
Summarizes the talks given at the conference. Much information is from Canadian researchers in Saskatchewan who are working on low water use legumes as fallow replacements.

5065. Patten, A.G.. 1982. Comparison of nitrogen and phosphorous flows on an organic and conventional farm.. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils, WSU, Pullman, WA.
Two adjacent farms, one organically managed and the other conventionally managed, located in the Palouse region of eastern WA, were studied for 2 years. Soil organic matter, total N, extractable P, and extractable K tended to be higher in the top 30 cm of soil from the organic farm. Mineral nitrogen in the top 30 cm of soil from the conventional farm was higher than or equal to that of the organic farm. Average long-term changes calculated in soil N and P pools resulted in substantial deficits of 44 and 14 kg/ha/yr, respectively, for the organic farm and 23 and 5 kg/ha/yr for the conventional farm. However, nutrients deficits were not reflected in lower soil N and P levels in the plot area tested on the organic farm as compared to the plot area on the conventional farm.

5225. Pieters, A.J.. 1927. Green manuring: principles and practice.. J. Wiley & Sons, N.Y. 356pp..
An excellent early summary of green manuring, in America and around the world; discusses the crucial role of maintaining soil organic matter; describes many green manure plants and their uses wiht various crops in different regions; over 350 references are cited. T: nitrogen value of green manures, biomass.

6545. Smith, V.T.. 1948. Green manure crops for Idaho farms.. U. of Idaho Ext. Circ. #105.
Estimates legume N contribution and dollar value: alfalfa - 260 lb N, $40/ac; sweetclover - 160 lb N, $24/ac; clover - 140 lb N, $21/ac; peas/beans - 50lb N, $7/ac; green manure provides nitrogen, improved soil condition, organic matter; results from 10 yr experiment; grow legume seed for cash crop.

6720. Stephenson, R.E.. 1941. Humus for Oregon soils.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. #143.
Four tons of stable manure were equal in value to 5 tons of green manure plowdown. The humus renewal of 1 yr legume sod equaled the humus lost during 1 yr row cropping. Plant material should never be burned. Fresh additions of organic matter stimulate root developement. Alfalfa for soil building - 2/3 of roots left below plow layer. Pea green manure raised OM content by 0.2% after 4 crops. Prairie grass adds 4T/ac roots in 4" of soil. T: organic matter levels and changes.

8200. Pieters, A.J.. 1917. Green manuring. A review of the American Experiment Station literature.. J. Amer. Soc. Agron. 9:62-83.

8793. Mallawatantri, A.P.. 1990. Effects of long-term management, slope position and depth on pesticide transport parameters.. unpublished manuscript, Program in Environmental Science, Washington St. Univ., Pullman, WA 99164.
Pesticide transport was studied in soils from the adjacent Lambert and Claussen farms, the former using green manures in rotation and no commercial fertilizer, and the latter using more typical farming practices. The four pesticides studied were 2,4-D, diuron, metribuzin, and triallate. Differences in organic carbon were found due to management history, and with depth and slope position on another site. Higher organic carbon on the Lambert farm led to more pesticide adsorption and less potential for leaching. At the mid-slope on the Lambert farm, increases in pesticide adsorption for 2,4-D and diuron is greater than can be explained by organic carbon alone. Triallate was less strongly adsorped in this study than its physio-chemical properties would indicate, while diuron was more strongly adsorbed than expected. The use of weakly adsorbed pesticides at top and middle slope positions where organic carbon is low may be risky.

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