WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, October 15, 2018

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Search results on 10/15/18

1632. Dormaar, J.F. and U.J. Pittman. 1980. Decomposition of organic residues as affected by various dryland spring wheat-fallow rotations.. Can. J. Soil Sci. 60:97-106.

2918. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1950. Annual Report. Id Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #280.
T: hay yields, economics

565. Auld, D.L., B.L. Bettis, M.J. Dial and G.A. Murray. 1982. Austrian winter and spring peas as green manure crops in northern Idaho.. Agron. J. 74:1047-1050.
T: organic matter and nitrogen contributions, pea yield.

2928. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1949. Annual report.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #276.
Sweetclover maintained OM levels, slight loss in W-P; N fertilizer reduced OM losses where straw was removed.

1710. Douglas, C.L., P.E. Rasmussen, L.L. Baarstad and R.R. Allmaras. 1984. Crop residue distribution by combines.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 713, p. 37-40.
Uniform distribution of wheat straw and chaff is necessary for success of conservation tillage programs. Results indicate that: a)standard factory-produced combines distributed straw and chaff unevenly in the field; b)straw-choppers did not automatically improve uniformity of distribution; c)a chaff spreading attatchment on a cylinder-type combine improved distribution significantly; and d)shop modification of flails on a rotary-type combine gave a nearly uniform distribution. Improvements on combines are seriously needed to assure the uniform straw and chaff distribution so necessary for successful adoption of conservation tillage systems. T: Straw distribution by cylinder and rotary combines.

2249. Granatstein, D., D. Bezdicek, L. Elliott, V. Cochran, and J. Hammel. 1987. Long-term tillage and rotation effects on soil microbial biomass, carbon, and nitrogen.. Biol. Fertil. Soils 5:265-270..
This research examined plots that had been under different tillage and rotational management for 12 years. Rotations were WP (winter wheat-spring pea); WBP (winter wheat-spring barley-spring pea); WPA (winter wheat-spring pea undersown with red clover and alfalfa)-clover/alfalfa GM). The two tillages studied were moldboard plowing and no-till. There was little difference in microbial biomass, C or N below 5 cm in the no-till, with surface values being highest. Few differences due to rotation could be detected. The WPA rotation had the highest total C and N. Microbial biomass was higher in no-till surface soils where the preceding crop had provided high residue, while the opposite was true for tilled plots. Microbial biomass levels changed little from April to September, and then jumped higher in October with the advent of moisture.

3013. Stroo, H.F., K.L. Bristow, L.F. Elliott, R.I. Papendick, and G.S.Campbell. 1989. Predicting rates of wheat straw decomposition.. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 53:91-99.
Predicting the rate and extent of decomposition of residues at the soil surface is necessary to evaluate the impacts of minimum tillage practices on erosion control and thus ensure the most effective use of residues. A mechanistic model simulating the decomposition of surface-managed winter wheat residues was developed and model predictions were compared to results from field studies of decomposition rates.

4229. McCurdy, C.W.. 1894. Idaho soils.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #9.
Palouse soils around Moscow, ID producing 30-60 bu/ac wheat; early soil test for soil organic matter %: pasture (virgin soil) = 6.87, subsoil = 9.55, cultivated = 13.95 and 13.65; method not known, results seem high.

5245. Pikul, J.L. and R.R. Allmaras. 1986. Physical and chemical properties of a haploxeroll after fifty years of residue management.. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 50(1):214-219.
Greater inference about the value of long-term crop residue management requires that soil chemical properties be measured together with soil physical properties. After 54 yrs of several different crop residue management treatments in a winter wheat-fallow system in the PNW, soil bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water desorption curves, soil organic carbon, and soil pH were all used to quantify the soil physical and chemical state. Quality of certain soil physical and chemical properties were altered. Changes in soil compaction since 1931 appear to be limited to the top 30m. However, soil compaction was greatest in the control and fall burn treatments where organic carbon addition was lowest. Crop residue management and fertilization with NH4 base fertilizer has had a marked effect on soil pH in the Ap horizon.

5807. Reinertsen, S.A., L.F. Elliott, V.L. Cochran and G.S. Campbell. 1984. Role of available carbon and nitrogen in determining the rate of wheat straw decomposition.. Soil Biol. Biochem., 16(5):459-464.
The amount of N immobilized during wheat straw decomposition is dependent on the amount of available C from both the primary and secondary pools present in the straw.

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