WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, July 23, 2018

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: moisture soil conservation

Use a different search term

Search results on 07/23/18

100. Aase, J.K. and L.L. Reitz. 1989. Conservation production systems with and without grass barriers in the northern Great Plains.. J. Soil and Water Conservation 44:320-323.
Double rows of tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum) were planted as barriers 48 ft apart near Culbertson, MT. The greatest soil water gain occurred during the harvest to spring period, with a precipitation storage efficiency ranging from 41-57 %. Annually cropped wheat and spring wheat following fallow responded positively to barrier protection. Yields were highest in the annual crop rotation of wheat-barley-safflower, followed by the 3-yr rotation with fallow. The traditional fallow-crop system had the lowest yields. Net returns paralleled yield results, and in most instances there was an economic benefit from the barriers. Also, safflower had a high net return and appears to have potential as an alternative crop in Montana.

11194. Dregne, H.E. and W.O. Willis (eds.). 1983. Dryland Agriculture.. Agronomy Monograph No. 23, Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.
This volume presents a thorough review of current dryland farming practices throughout the western United States and Canada. It covers water conservation, soil conservation, cropping practices, pests, and socioeconomics. The chapters are fully referenced.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us