WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Thursday, January 18, 2018

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661. Barnes, O.K. and D.W. Bohmont. 1958. Effect of cropping practices on water intake rates in the northern Great Plains.. WY Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 358.
The rate of water absorbed by the soil was evaluated on bare fallow, trashy fallow, and grassland. Total absorbed water in one hour was 1.55, 2.80, and 2.11 inches for the respective covers. The water intake rate at one hour was 0.3 in/hr for bare fallow and 2.26 in/hr for trashy fallow. Water intake rates associated with other tillage practices are also presented in this bulletin.

1360. Cochran, V.L., L.F. Elliott, and R.I. Papendick. 1982. Effect of crop residue management and tillage on water use efficiency and yield of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 74:929-932.

6919. Unger, P.W.. 1975. Role of mulches in dryland agriculture. p. 239-258.. IN: U.S. Gupta (ed.). Physiological Aspects of Dryland Farming..

5593. Ramig, R.E. and L.G. Ekin. 1978. Soil water storage as influenced by tillage and crop residue management.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. 1978 Progress Report..

6937. Unger, P.W., G.W. Langdale, and R.I. Papendick. 1988. Role of crop residues - improving water conservation and use. p. 69-100.. IN: W.L. Hargrove (ed.). Cropping Strategies for Efficient Use of Water and Nitrogen..

10040. Wohld, M.. 1991 Mar.. Good farming practices reduced erosion this winter.. Washington Farmer-Stockman, p. 22-23..
Erosion would have been worse after the winter of 1990-91 if it had not been for good erosion control measures such as strip cropping, divided slopes and straw residue management. Strip cropping and divided slopes alone can reduce erosion by about 50%. Leaving as little as 200 pounds of straw residue on the surface per acre can have some positive impact on erosion, according to WSU research. Strip cropping is also important for moisture conservation.

10245. Ramig, R.E. and L.G. Ekin. 1991. When do we store water with fallow?. 1991 Columbia Basin Agricultural Research, Special Report 879, OR Agr. Expt. Sta., Corvallis.
Water storage was monitored at Pendleton (16" precip.) and Moro (11" precip.), Oregon from 1978-1984. Storage percentages for the fallow winter, fallow summer, and crop winter were 75, -19, and 54 %, respectively. Significantly less water was stored during the fallow winter in both rainfall zones where the wheat stubble had been burned in the fall. Differences in water conservation and storage among other treatments (spring plow, fall flail, fall disk, and spring sweep) were not significant at both locations. Total water storage for the 18-month crop-fallow cycle was 37 % at Moro and 33% at Pendleton. The best opportunity to improve water conservation and storage in this climate appears to be during the crop winter when only 40-54% of the precipitation was stored.

11214. Unger, P.W., W.R. Jordan, T.V. Sneed, and R.W. Jensen. 1988. Challenges in Dryland Agriculture: A Global Perspective.. Proc. Intl. Conf. on Dryland Farming, Bushland, TX, Aug. 15-19, 1988..
The proceedings consists of more than 280 scientific papers on dryland farming. Subject areas include sustainability, soil erosion, water conservation, agroclimatology, soil fertility, residue management, socioeconomic issues, environmental issues, cropping systems, and crop/livestock systems.

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