WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: moisture moisture conservation

Use a different search term

Search results on 12/12/18

100. Aase, J.K. and L.L. Reitz. 1989. Conservation production systems with and without grass barriers in the northern Great Plains.. J. Soil and Water Conservation 44:320-323.
Double rows of tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum) were planted as barriers 48 ft apart near Culbertson, MT. The greatest soil water gain occurred during the harvest to spring period, with a precipitation storage efficiency ranging from 41-57 %. Annually cropped wheat and spring wheat following fallow responded positively to barrier protection. Yields were highest in the annual crop rotation of wheat-barley-safflower, followed by the 3-yr rotation with fallow. The traditional fallow-crop system had the lowest yields. Net returns paralleled yield results, and in most instances there was an economic benefit from the barriers. Also, safflower had a high net return and appears to have potential as an alternative crop in Montana.

3170. . 1988. International Symposium on Windbreaks Proceedings.. Agric. Ecosystems, Environ. 22/23.

5725. Rasmussen, V.P. and R.L. Newhall. 1989. High residue conservation tillage increases soil moisture and profits. IN: Utah Agricultural Statistics, 1989. p. 121-124. Utah Agricultural Statistics Service, Salt Lake City, UT.
Three years of data are reported for several locations comparing a number of consevation tillage and cropping systems. The no-till and chemical fallow were better both for conserving soil and moisture, and generated the highest net returns. The chem fallow conserved about 1-2 inches of soil moisture. Erosion under the no-till chem fallow ranged from 1-5 T/ac compared to 17-30 T/ac with conventional tillage. The study included tests of continuous cropping, but more years are needed to make an economic comparison.

10040. Wohld, M.. 1991 Mar.. Good farming practices reduced erosion this winter.. Washington Farmer-Stockman, p. 22-23..
Erosion would have been worse after the winter of 1990-91 if it had not been for good erosion control measures such as strip cropping, divided slopes and straw residue management. Strip cropping and divided slopes alone can reduce erosion by about 50%. Leaving as little as 200 pounds of straw residue on the surface per acre can have some positive impact on erosion, according to WSU research. Strip cropping is also important for moisture conservation.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us