WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Saturday, March 24, 2018


Browse on keywords: moisture economics

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Search results on 03/24/18

3298. Burt, O.R. and M.S. Stauber. 1989. Dryland cropping decision theory with application to saline seep control.. J. Production Agr. 2:47-57.
A model for decision making in a flex-crop system is presented, based on plant available soil water at seeding, previous land use, and economic return. The strategy can be used for winter or spring wheat.

4827. Nelson, E.. 1908. Dry farming in Idaho. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #62.
Caldwell, ID - better sites yield 30-40 bu/ac wheat, even 60; alfalfa - several cuttings; drier sites yield 20-30 bu/ac; in Utah, 1" of rain stored in soil produces 2.5 bu wheat; summerfallow necessary; eastern WA - late spring plowing with early disking and harrowing is effective weed control; "slicker" - homemade tool in Columbia Basin to kill weeds; Subsurface packer - after plowing, increased yields in Columbia Basin 25%. Idaho soils - short on N and humus; alternate crop possibilities: milo, sorghum, field peas, alfalfa, grass; also spring emer (speltz), hulled wheat (adapted to arid conditions); WW vs. SW has 4-5 bu/ac yield advantage.

5725. Rasmussen, V.P. and R.L. Newhall. 1989. High residue conservation tillage increases soil moisture and profits. IN: Utah Agricultural Statistics, 1989. p. 121-124. Utah Agricultural Statistics Service, Salt Lake City, UT.
Three years of data are reported for several locations comparing a number of consevation tillage and cropping systems. The no-till and chemical fallow were better both for conserving soil and moisture, and generated the highest net returns. The chem fallow conserved about 1-2 inches of soil moisture. Erosion under the no-till chem fallow ranged from 1-5 T/ac compared to 17-30 T/ac with conventional tillage. The study included tests of continuous cropping, but more years are needed to make an economic comparison.

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