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Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, July 22, 2018

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Search results on 07/22/18

2015. Foulds, W.. 1978. Response to soil moisture supply in three leguminous species. I. Growth, reproduction and mortality.. New Phytol. 80:535-545..
The study compared white clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and black medic under conditions of high and low soil moisture. Black medic exhibited the most plasticity to moisture condition. On moist soils, it formed substantial vegetative growth and high numbers of seed. In drought conditions, it was the most tolerant at all growth stages, forming many seeds even when vegetative growth was low. Seeds per plant at high and low moisture were 80,000 and 3000 respectively. Competition by perennials during black medic seedling growth seriously inhibits the colonization of this species. Both the immature and adult stages of black medic show an effective avoidance of desiccation.

7850. Koala, S.. 1982. Adaptation of Australian ley farming to Montana dryland cereal production.. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Plant and Soil Sci., Montana St. Univ., Bozeman, MT 59717.
This study examined the potential to adapt the ley farming system used in Australia to dryland cereal production in Montana. The ley system alternates a grain crop with a self-seeding forage legume. The legumes tested in this study included 5 Australian medics, 7 subclovers, 2 lupins, fababean, and a native Montana black medic. One full cycle of the system was completed. All grain yields (spring wheat) were higher after the legumes than after fallow. Soil water to 120 cm was similar in all plots at wheat planting. The black medic treatment had the highest water use efficiency (100 kg grain/cm) and fallow the lowest (55 kg grain/cm). There were higher levels of soil nitrate after the legumes than after fallow. Re-establishment of the legumes after wheat ranged from 3 to 93% ground cover, with black medic being the highest. Overall, black medic from Montana performed best in this study.

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