WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: legume moisture

Use a different search term

Search results on 07/22/18

6525. Brown, P.L.. 1965. Legumes and grasses in dryland cropping systems in the Northern and Central Great Plains.. USDA-ARS Misc. Publ. No. 952.

483. Army, T.J. and J.C. Hide. 1959. Effects of green manure crops on dryland wheat production in the Great Plains area of Montana.. Agron. J. 51:196-198.
This paper summarizes the results from the green manure treatments which were a part of a 38-year study (1914-1951) of numerous small grain rotations involving wheat, barley, oats, corn, and fallow in various combinations. The rotation experiments were carried out at several Great Plains experiment stations including Havre, Huntley, and Moccasin, Montana, and Sheridan, Wyoming. The results indicated that winter rye, field pea, and sweetclover green manures had no effect at all or a depressing effect on small grain yields the following year as compared to ordinary fallow. The results of this unreplicated study are the most likely reason that research on dryland legume-cereal rotations essentially ceased in Montana until 1978. Although legume green manures, ideally, may impart several beneficial effects on ensuing cereal crops, the primary benefit is the release of symbiotically fixed nitrogen. The legume green manures in the long-term study at Moccasin and Huntley had little chance of improving wheat yields compared to ordinary fallow for several reasons. First, the soils involved, and most Montana soils indeed, had not yet become deficient in N as they are today. Organic matter had begun to decline by the 1950's but it still provided ample N to meet the needs of wheat yield potentials of that era. Also, the management of the legumes in these early studies is questionable as one passage from the report suggested that when the green manure crops were not successfully established, thee was invariably a good crop of Russian thistle (Salsola kali L.) to plow under. Possible other factors lending to their failure include inefficient storage of winter precipitation, late seeding, poor timing of plow down, and a lack of nodulation which continues to be a problem of dryland legume culture today, especially with small-seeded legumes. The above substantiate their conclusion that the main effect of the green manures was to reduce the water available to the ensuing grain crops. A re-examination of the Moccasin and Huntley, Montana data indicates that grain yields after green manures were slightly higher than grain yields after fallow for eight of the last ten years of the study.

805. Bezdicek, D.. no date. (STEEP green manure plots). unpublished.
Examined 3 legume green manures (red clover, Austrian winter pea, hairy vetch) and harvested spring pea, with 3 incorporations (plow, disk, chemical kill) and 3 N rates (0, 67, 134 kg N/ha). Prior to tillage, red clover and hairy vetch depleted 3.4 cm/m more moisture than spring pea, and AWP depleted 1.8 cm/m more. Soil residual N was highest under spring pea and lowest under red clover. N fixation estimates ranged from 76 for spring pea to 114 for AWP. Winter wheat yield was highest following red clover that had been plowed or disked. Chemical kill appeared to inhibit wheat yield, and N fertilizer could not overcome this depression. Yields after AWP were lower than red clover but higher than spring peas. Recovery of pea and wheat residue N ranged from 7-10% by a following wheat crop. Overseeding of red clover in a spring cereal was successful. T: residual moisture, N; yield response to the various treatments; recovery of N.

816. Bezdicek, D.. no date. (Influence of residual soil N on N2 fixation; N2 fixation of chickpeas). unpublished.
High levels of residual soil N decreased N2 fixation. There was a negative correlation between the fraction of plant N derived from N2 fixation and total mineralizable N and KCl extractable N. N2 fixation was reduced by about 2.8 kg/ha for each kg/ha of available soil N. Seed yield response from inoculation ranged from 5-70% and was negatively correlated with available soil N. Residual soil moisture in July was greatestfor large seeded legumes > forage legumes > winter wheat. T: N fixation in chickpeas.

826. Bezdicek, D. and R. Lockerman. no date. Crop rotation and the response of cereal crops to nitrogen in the PNW. unpublished.
Experiments conducted at Pullman, WA and Bozeman, MT. Year 1 - legumes (rainfall -Pullman 500 mm, Bozeman 480 mm). Year 2 -Pullman winter wheat + N (rainfall 350 mm); Bozeman barley + N (rainfall 200 mm). Compared fababean, pea, lentil, chickpea, fallow at both locations. Pullman legumes were used as green manure, Bozeman legumes were harvested for seed. N fertilizer equivalents ranged from 30-86 kg/ha N at Pullman (fallow = 125) and from 27-81 kg/ha N at Bozeman (fallow = 53). All cereals responded to added N, although less so at Pullman. More N was removed in seed than was fixed. Seed legumes appeared to fix 50-100 kg/ha N. The rotation effect was more significant at Pullman. T: cereal yields; fertilizer N equivalent; moisture depletion.

2015. Foulds, W.. 1978. Response to soil moisture supply in three leguminous species. I. Growth, reproduction and mortality.. New Phytol. 80:535-545..
The study compared white clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and black medic under conditions of high and low soil moisture. Black medic exhibited the most plasticity to moisture condition. On moist soils, it formed substantial vegetative growth and high numbers of seed. In drought conditions, it was the most tolerant at all growth stages, forming many seeds even when vegetative growth was low. Seeds per plant at high and low moisture were 80,000 and 3000 respectively. Competition by perennials during black medic seedling growth seriously inhibits the colonization of this species. Both the immature and adult stages of black medic show an effective avoidance of desiccation.

3589. Kirby, E.M.. 1987. Soil moisture depletion and wheat yield response from annual legumes in the Pacific Northwest. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils, WSU, Pullman, WA.
Legumes included chickpea, spring pea, lentil, fababean, sweetclover, rose clover, black medic, barrel medic. Sweetclover depleted more soil moisture than other legumes. Wheat yield increased following legumes relative to that after barley. Highest yield followed legume green manure with additional fertilizer N. Grain yields were similar for fallow, lentil, pea, chickpea, and fababean. T: soil moisture depletion; yield, N content of soil and grain.

5474. Pumphrey, F.V., T.R. Toll and B.L. Klepper. 1985. Edible legume seed yield and water use.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 738, p.44-49.
General growth characteristics, seed yields, and water use of four edible legumes grown at the Pendleton Station are reported. Brewer and Chilean 78 lentils are not as adapted to this climate as are Latah peas. Chickpeas produced yields, seed size, and seed color which would warrant further testing of this species. Production of Diana fababean was not encouraging because of its growth habit and productivity. T: Flowering, maturity and seed yield of legumes, Pendleton, OR. Average weekly water use for Latah peas, Brewer lentil, chickpea, and Diana fababean, Pendleton, OR.

6238. Siddoway, F.H. and H.C. McKay. 1955. The establishment of sweetclover in dry land areas.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #227, Combined series.
Best method - sweetclover drilled in alternate rows with spring grain; evaluated 14 establishment methods at Tetonia, ID. T: yields, establishment, N value.

7850. Koala, S.. 1982. Adaptation of Australian ley farming to Montana dryland cereal production.. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Plant and Soil Sci., Montana St. Univ., Bozeman, MT 59717.
This study examined the potential to adapt the ley farming system used in Australia to dryland cereal production in Montana. The ley system alternates a grain crop with a self-seeding forage legume. The legumes tested in this study included 5 Australian medics, 7 subclovers, 2 lupins, fababean, and a native Montana black medic. One full cycle of the system was completed. All grain yields (spring wheat) were higher after the legumes than after fallow. Soil water to 120 cm was similar in all plots at wheat planting. The black medic treatment had the highest water use efficiency (100 kg grain/cm) and fallow the lowest (55 kg grain/cm). There were higher levels of soil nitrate after the legumes than after fallow. Re-establishment of the legumes after wheat ranged from 3 to 93% ground cover, with black medic being the highest. Overall, black medic from Montana performed best in this study.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us