WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

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Saturday, September 22, 2018

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Search results on 09/22/18

7662. Wright, A.T. and E. Coxworth. 1987. Benefits from pulses in the cropping systems of northern Canada. p. 108. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems..
Investigated yield and N response in barley and wheat, 1 and 2 years after pulse crops of fababean, pea, and lentil. Overall yields were higher on fababean and field pea residues than lentils. Soil tests could not attribute yield differences among crop residues to differences in soil N levels at time of seeding. Nitrogen fertilizer equivalents for barley were 105, 85, and 50 lb N/ac for fababean, peas, and lentils. Legume residues influenced barley grain quality. In the second year following pulses, the dry matter yield, grain yield, and N uptake of wheat was 15% higher than in the continuous cereal sequence. Analysis of 3 completed rotation cycles showed that cropping sequences that included pulses were considerably more productive than the continuous cereal sequence in terms of net energy production and economic gross margin to cash costs. Field peas were the most effective first-year crop in terms of net energy production.

7786. Engel, R., L.E. Welty, R. Lockerman, J. Bergman, G. Kushnak, L. Prestbye, and J. Sims. 1987. Annual legumes and cereal grain rotations in Montana.. Montana AgResearch 4(3):1-4.
Montana researchers examined the performance of several grain legumes (dry pea, chickpea, lentil) and their effect on a subsequent barley crop. Dry pea production was the highest. A subsequent barley crop rsponded to added N fertilizer at three out of six sites. Barley yields following legumes were generally equal to or greater than yields following fallow. The annual legumes contributed to soil N and reduced the fertilizer N needed to reach maximum yield by 40-55 lb N/ac when compared to recrop barley. This translated into savings of $10-14/ac for fertilizer N.

8907. Bremer, E., R.J. Rennie, and D.A. Rennie. 1988. Dinitrogen fixation of lentil, field pea and fababean under dryland conditions.. Can. J. Soil Sci. 68:553-562.
N15 was used to study the N-fixation of several grain legumes in Saskatchewan, with all major soil zones represented. Indigenous rhizobia were incapable of supporting adequate levels of N2 fixation at most sites. Inoculation increased total dry matter, total N, and N2 fixation of all legume cultivars tested. Annual rates of N2 fixation were as high as 75, 105, and 160 kg N/ha for lentil, pea, and fababean, respectively on gray and gray-black soils in one year, but declined by an average of 5.3, 7.6, and 10.5 kg N/ha, repsectively, for every cm reduction in moisture use. Fababean fixed the most N under wetter conditions, while pea and lentil fixed the most under drought stress conditions. The amount of N fixed was not significantly correlated with soil nitrate levels in either year, perhaps due to the overriding effects of moisture. Estimates of the % plant N derived from atmospheric fixation ranged from 30-80%, with fababean generally the highest. The % from atmosphere was negatively correlated to soil nitrate for pea and lentil.

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