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555. Auld, D.L., G.A. Murray, and R.V. Withers. 1983. Austrian winter peas: a green manure crop for Idaho.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #652.
Good % of pea N is from soil; best to plow under right after flowering; Melrose contributed 278 lb/ac of vine N; winter peas produced slightly more biomass than spring peas, but fall peas can be plowed 2 weeks earlier; spring peas accumulated 70 lb N/ac more than winter peas; variable cost of WW-SB-SF = $63/ac, uses 120 lb N/ac; for WW-SB-pea GM = $59/ac, with only 40 lb N/ac; must consider intangible benifits; recommended green manure crop every 3-5 years. T: organic matter yield, nitrogen content, costs.

835. Bezdicek, D.F.. 1990 Jan.. Crop rotation studies. presentation at STEEP Annual Review, Moscow, ID.
Several studies were described in which different legume green manures were grown before winter wheat and treated with different residue management. Wheat yields were consistently depressed following chemically-killed legumes in the first study, but not in the second. Under chemical kill, there was a 40 bu/ac wheat yield response to soil fumigation. Part of the fumigation response appeared to be higher available N. Also, it appeared that chemical kill may be increasing N mineralization. Results are being prepared for publication.

1540. Davis, J.B.. 1988. Winter rapeseed (Brassica napus) with differential levels of glucosinolates evaluated to suppress Aphanomyces root rot.. M.S. Thesis.
Winter rapeseed (Brassica napus) with differential levels of glucosinolates were evaluated as a green manure crop to suppress Aphanomyces root rot of peas.

3955. Mahler, R.L. and D.L. Auld. 1989. Evaluation of the green manure potential of Austrian winter peas in northern Idaho.. Agron. J. 81:258-264.
Austrian winter peas were evaluated as a green manure (GM) or seed pea (SP) crop, along with soil N levels, and subsequent yields of winter wheat (WW) and spring barley (SB). Four rotations were tested: GM-WW-SB; SP-WW-SB; SB-WW-SP; SF-WW-SB. Average N fertilizer equivalent values of 94, 75, and 68 kg/ha were provided by GM, SP, and SF (fallow) respectively, to the following wheat crop. Yield differences due to crop rotation or N fertilization rate were not observed in the third year of the cropping sequence. Austrian winter peas used as either a GM or SP provided more inorganic N than SF or SB. Although cereal crop yields were comparable, the SP-WW-SB was more profitable than GM-WW-SB or SF-WW-SB, due to the extra harvested crop.

4022. Mahler, R.L.. 1990. Nitrogen database project - final report.. unpublished report for Dryland Cereal/Legume LISA project.
This project had two components: 1) development of a comprehensive database on winter wheat response to nitrogen fertilizer rates; 2) evaluation of the potential of peas, alfalfa, and wheat straw as nitrogen sources for a following wheat crop in rotation. The database study examined winter wheat yield response to 41 nitrogen rates. When soil test N + mineralizable N + fertilizer N ranged from 101 to 175 kg/ha, a requirement of 2.75 lb N per bushel of wheat was calculated. This agrees with the figure calculated by Leggett in the 1950's, indicating that modern varieties have not changed in their basic nitrogen requirement, when nitrogen fertilizer efficiency is assumed to be 50%. At total available N rates greater than 175 kg/ha, the N requirement per bushel of wheat increased dramatically. Low rates did not show a large increase in efficiency on a per bushel basis. At Moscow, N fertilizer application rates less than 95 kg/ha resulted in greater than 50% N use efficiency. Efficiency declined rapidly at rates above this. The green manure study compared alfalfa, pea, and green wheat straw residues applied at 1, 2, and 3 mt/ha. In general, higher rates of pea and alfalfa resulted in higher wheat yields. The highest yields were with the high rate of pea residue. It was more effective than alfalfa residue, probably due to faster decomposition. Alfalfa provided more N per ton of residue (31 kg/mt) than the peas (29 kg/mt), while straw added 19 kg/mt.

6228. Siddoway, F.H. and H.C. McKay. 1962. Tillage of sweetclover under dryland conditions.. ID Agr. Ext. Service Bull. #388 Combined Series.
Sweetclover used in 2 systems: spring grain - fallow (limited growing season, precip>14"); winter grain - fallow (precip <14", growing season adequate); 3-8 lb/ac biennial Madrid sweetclover; less weed growth after sweetclover kill than on summerfallow after wheat; sweep tillage worked well in dry years; moldboard plow was the most consistent kill; sweep left about 35% of sweetclover residue on surface; higher soil nitrates after moldboard plow; no signficant effect on soil moisture; yield correlated to soil moisture; yields 16-18 bu/ac; no control plots. T: nitrogen, soil moisture, wheat yield.

6545. Smith, V.T.. 1948. Green manure crops for Idaho farms.. U. of Idaho Ext. Circ. #105.
Estimates legume N contribution and dollar value: alfalfa - 260 lb N, $40/ac; sweetclover - 160 lb N, $24/ac; clover - 140 lb N, $21/ac; peas/beans - 50lb N, $7/ac; green manure provides nitrogen, improved soil condition, organic matter; results from 10 yr experiment; grow legume seed for cash crop.

6989. USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1964. Technical standards and specifications.. Green manure, code 340.
Lists legume green manure species adapted to different land capability units, and the recommended management; alfalfa, sweetclover on drier, more eroded sites; red and white clover on wetter sites.

7242. Veseth, R.. 1989. Reduced tillage for green manure legumes. STEEP Conservation Farming Update, Summer 1989, p. 3-5.
Three tillages were compared for incorporating Austrian winter pea or red clover green manure: moldboard plow plus shallow disk; shallow disk twice; no-till. At each N fertilizer rate, winter wheat yields were slightly higher with reduced tillage than with conventional tillage. A 60 lb/ac N rate substantially increased wheat yields after green manure, while the 120 N rate gave little or no yield increase. With no N fertilizer, the yield of winter wheat after both green manure crops compared favorably with yield of no-till winter wheat after a seed crop of spring peas. Legume N uptake by a following wheat crop was not affected by residue treatment, but recovery of legume N from the soil was about 10% lower with surface application than with soil incorporation. Also, wheat yields after chemically-killed green manures were consistently lower, and could not be fully recovered with fertilizer N. The mechanism of this suppression is not known.

8763. Smith, Larry. n.d.. An evaluation of green manure plowdown systems in Nex Perce County, Idaho.. unpublished results from Cooperative Extension, 1239 Idaho St., Lewiston, ID 83501.
Three growers evaluated the nitrogen benefits and economics of their use of green manure legumes prior to winter wheat production. Two farmers used Austrain winter pea, and one used a sweetclover/red clover mix. Soil tests at various stages of production indicated an increase in available N (0-3') after green manure plowdown of 60-200 lb/ac. The cost of the green manure ranged from $15-27/ac. Clover appeared to produce the most N (191 lb/ac) while winter peas returned 62-116 lb/ac. Landlords did not charge rent for the green manure year, which helped the economic viability. Residual N values indicated that fertilizer N could have been greatly reduced or eliminated for the winter wheat after plowdown. Net returns for the two-year period ranged from $95-215/ac.

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