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Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Friday, June 22, 2018

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Search results on 06/22/18

7434. Walter, D.T.. 1987. Early studies on the use of legumes for conservation tillage in Nebraska.. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems. p. 9-10.
Describes early research beginning in the 1930s. Surface residues, especially alfalfa, improved soil structure and infiltration. Erosion and runoff from dense, subtilled legume plots was minimal compared to oat or wheat stubble. Sweetclover and alfalfa were the principal legumes. Erosion and excess N mineralization were problems with sweetclover. Subtilling legume residues retarded decomposition and nitrification, increased earthworm casts, and enhanced aggregate stability. When sweetclover decomposed on the surface, 5-10 lb N/ac were lost as NH3, with only a trace lost when residue was plowed under.

8897. Kroontje, W. and W.R. Kehr. 1956. Legume top and root yields in the year of seeding and subsequent barley yield.. Agronomy J. 48:127-131.
No significant difference in forage and root yields were measured among 6 alfalfa varieties and between hardy and non-hardy varieties. Forage production of Hubam and Madrid sweetclovers was equal. Barley yields following alfalfas and Hubam sweetclover were similar. Madrid depressed barley yields. Barley yield after vetches was superior to all other legumes. Contains good tables on root and top partitions under different cutting regimes.

10215. McClure, N.R., A.L. Hafenrichter, and J.L. Schwendiman. 1958. Grasses and legumes for conservation farming in north-central Oregon and adjacent areas.. USDA-Soil Conservation Service, Portland, OR..
This publication summarizes the findings of an on-farm plant nursery near Condon, OR, that was set up by the SCS to field test promising drought-tolerant grasses and legumes. Recommended mixtures for various purposes (hay, green manure, conservation) are listed. Yield data for four years are presented as well.

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