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Monday, October 22, 2018

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5362. Power, J.F. (ed.). 1987. The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems.. Soil Cons. Soc. Amer., Ankeny, IA. 153 pp..
Proceedings of a national conference, University of Georgia, Athens, April 27-29, 1987. Excellent reference for the use of legumes in cropping systems and their compatibility with conservation tillage. Major sections include: the need; germplasm resources; nitrogen source; insects and diseases; cropping practices; weed control; erosion and productivity; economics.

10185. USDA Agricultural Research Service.. 1957. Grasses and legumes for forage and conservation.. Special Report ARS 22-43, USDA-ARS, Washington, D.C..
This report gives a short description of over 50 grass and legume species suitable for conservation use in various parts of the U.S. Generalized maps of adaptation are included that suggest species for the dryland cereal region of the Northwest.

2918. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1950. Annual Report. Id Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #280.
T: hay yields, economics

643. Baker, V.W. and I.P. Swanson. 1962. Economic effects of a grass-legume rotation in Palouse wheat-pea area.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Circular #183.
Farms using a grass-legume rotation show important economic advantages over other farms in comparison of 5 year data from 3 pairs of Palouse farms. T: Amount of cropland by type of crop. Average annual crop production. Cost inputs and income per cropland acre. Calculated erosion losses.

1104. Buchanan, S.C. and J.K. Whittaker. 1980. Grass and legume seed production in the Northwest: Present situattion.. Pacific Northwest Regional Commission..
A conventional economic analysis. However, consideration of the low input nature of this crop is provided in the section Future Production Issues. "One reason for the low per acre costs of grass and legume seed production is the small resource requirements." Although this report does not include the potential of grass and legume seed production for dryland wheat/pea areas, it does provide a good overview of economic considerations for production. T: Cost of production per acre for various crops.

1475. Crea, M.. 1978. Idaho agricultural commodity statistics. Historical series 1900-1976.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Misc. Series #43.

1765. Dunbar, B. and D. Nielsen. 1987. White lupins as a rotation alternative with winter wheat in conservation tillage systems.. IN: J.F. Power(ed.) The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems.
Tested white lupin adaptability to irrigated and non-irrigated conditions in Colorado. Screened the crop for a number of herbicides, none of which was entirely satisfactory. All damaged or killed the lupins at rates needed to control weeds. Non-irrigated yields were about 30 bu/ac, up to 50 bu/ac with full irrigation. Lupins did not appear to utilize stored soil water at lower depths.

1998. Fletcher, O.S.. 1923. Growing sweetclover in Latah county.. V.Kaiser papers, box 1, folder 66.
Results of a survey of farmers using sweetclover; mostly interested in summer pasture; using biennial white; need firm seedbed, 10-15 lb seed/ac, early spring planting; mixed results with a nurse crop, less winterkill when planted alone; good results from inoculation; 1-2 1/2 T hay/ac the second year; following crops showed yield increase; no problem with weediness; most stock did well on sweetclover, except horses.

2200. Goldstein, W.A. and Young, D.L.. 1987. An agronomic and economic comparison of a conventional and a low-input cropping system in the Palouse.. Amer. J. Alternative Agriculture 2(2):51-56.
Describes the results of Goldstein's work with the pea-medic/medic/wheat rotation in comparison with a wheat/barley/wheat/pea rotation. Variable costs for PALS were 44% of those in the conventional system. The conventional system generated higher gross returns, and higher net returns under subsidized prices, while the PALS was economically attractive at market prices.

2221. Goldstein, Walter A.. 1986. Alternative crops, rotations, and management systems for dryland farming.. Ph.D. dissertation, Agronomy and Soils, WSU.
This work covers a number of research areas, including the use of edible white lupine as an alternative crop, the use of black medic in rotation with spring peas and winter wheat (the PALS concept), performance of winter wheat as influenced by rotations, fertilization, and fumigation; rotational effects of medics; wheat interference with weeds; costs and returns of alternative systems; comparison of agronomic effects of conventional, organic, and biodynamic management. The PALS (perpetuating alternative legume system) concept was field-tested using a pea + medic - medic GM - winter wheat rotation with limited inputs of agrichemicals and tillage. This system was more economic using market prices of commodities at both a low and high yield level. With government support prices, the PALS system was competitive in the low yield situation, but not the high. Rotational effects appeared to suppress weeds in wheat with the medic compared to a continuous cereal system.

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