WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, June 24, 2018

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Search results on 06/24/18

10185. USDA Agricultural Research Service.. 1957. Grasses and legumes for forage and conservation.. Special Report ARS 22-43, USDA-ARS, Washington, D.C..
This report gives a short description of over 50 grass and legume species suitable for conservation use in various parts of the U.S. Generalized maps of adaptation are included that suggest species for the dryland cereal region of the Northwest.

100. Aase, J.K. and L.L. Reitz. 1989. Conservation production systems with and without grass barriers in the northern Great Plains.. J. Soil and Water Conservation 44:320-323.
Double rows of tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum) were planted as barriers 48 ft apart near Culbertson, MT. The greatest soil water gain occurred during the harvest to spring period, with a precipitation storage efficiency ranging from 41-57 %. Annually cropped wheat and spring wheat following fallow responded positively to barrier protection. Yields were highest in the annual crop rotation of wheat-barley-safflower, followed by the 3-yr rotation with fallow. The traditional fallow-crop system had the lowest yields. Net returns paralleled yield results, and in most instances there was an economic benefit from the barriers. Also, safflower had a high net return and appears to have potential as an alternative crop in Montana.

10215. McClure, N.R., A.L. Hafenrichter, and J.L. Schwendiman. 1958. Grasses and legumes for conservation farming in north-central Oregon and adjacent areas.. USDA-Soil Conservation Service, Portland, OR..
This publication summarizes the findings of an on-farm plant nursery near Condon, OR, that was set up by the SCS to field test promising drought-tolerant grasses and legumes. Recommended mixtures for various purposes (hay, green manure, conservation) are listed. Yield data for four years are presented as well.

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