WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, March 18, 2018


Browse on keywords: grass OR

Use a different search term

Search results on 03/18/18

10185. USDA Agricultural Research Service.. 1957. Grasses and legumes for forage and conservation.. Special Report ARS 22-43, USDA-ARS, Washington, D.C..
This report gives a short description of over 50 grass and legume species suitable for conservation use in various parts of the U.S. Generalized maps of adaptation are included that suggest species for the dryland cereal region of the Northwest.

2918. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1950. Annual Report. Id Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #280.
T: hay yields, economics

2415. Hanna, M.R., G.C. Kozub, and S. Smoliak. 1977. Forage production of sanfoin and alfalfa on dryland in mixed- and alternate-row seedings with three grasses.. Canadian J. Plant Sci. 57:61-70.
Alfalfa-grass yielded better than sanfoin grass. Sanfoin is a suitable alternative to alfalfa in parts of the prairie region, but particular attention must be paid to the selection of companion species if it is to be grown in association with a grass. Russian wild rye was the most productive companion in this study. Mixed row seedings were higher for all combinations except sanfoin-pubescent wheatgrass in alternate rows. Sanfoin does not causse bloat, but stands are generally shorter-lived than alfalfa. Pure stands of sanfoin may yield the most, but grasses will extend the life of the stand.

2527. Henderson, L.F.. 1903. Grasses and forage plants in Idaho.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #38.
Gives a short description of various grasses and forage, and evaluates them for Idaho conditions.

3338. Jacob, I.. 1989. Grass seed industry poised for growth explosion.. Capitol Press, Salem, OR.
Growing demand for grass seed; need research on straw utilization. Oregon has doubled grass seed sales in the past 5 years.

3570. Kent, R.L.. 1957. Conservation crop rotations in the PNW.. J. Soil Water Conservation, 12(6): 269.
Experimental data and observations indicate that crop rotations with grass and legumes is needed in the wheat-pea area. Also of importance are strip croping, contour operation, stubble mulching, early seeding of winter wheat. T: comparison of OM, water loss, soil loss from virgin land and crop land.

4077. Mason, J.L. and J.E. Miltimore. 1959. Increase in yield and protein content of native bluebunch wheatgrass from nitrogen fertilization.. Canadian J. Plant Sci. 39:501-504.
Native bluebunch wheatgrass in Okanagan Valley (11" precip.) showed marked response to nitrogen fertilization. Dry matter production doubled with 60N added as ammonium nitrate, protein increased from 3.9 to 6.2 %. Fertilizer also increased ground cover by the desirable grasses.

4358. McHenry, J.R., L.T. Alexander and L.L. Zook. 1946. Carbon and nitrogen contents of a chernozem soil as affected by age of perennial grass sods.. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 11:407-412.
Compared soil organic carbon and nitrogen changes due to perennial grass established 0-9 yrs; C and N decreased under all treatments, although the changes were slight with more than 6 yr sod; only with >6 yr sod were C and N % significantly greater than continuous cultivation; the system may have been nutrient limited, or it may take longer to develop equilibrium; root mass ranged from 1600-5200 lb/ac/yr. T: carbon and nitrogen levels; root mass.

6720. Stephenson, R.E.. 1941. Humus for Oregon soils.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. #143.
Four tons of stable manure were equal in value to 5 tons of green manure plowdown. The humus renewal of 1 yr legume sod equaled the humus lost during 1 yr row cropping. Plant material should never be burned. Fresh additions of organic matter stimulate root developement. Alfalfa for soil building - 2/3 of roots left below plow layer. Pea green manure raised OM content by 0.2% after 4 crops. Prairie grass adds 4T/ac roots in 4" of soil. T: organic matter levels and changes.

6978. USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1938. Study of erosion controlling forage plants.. USDA - SCS, Pullman, WA.
Promising new legumes - milk vetch species, big headed clover, flat pea, siberian alfalfa, black medic, trailing birdsfoot, sanfoin, lupin, Montana goldenpea, perennial vetch. Yellow sweetclover was superior to white under drought conditions; dwarf varieties recommended in drier areas; clipping sweetclover reduced vigor, hay yield and total N per acre; Ladak the best alfalfa variety for the region.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us