WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: fertility nitrogen PA

Use a different search term

Search results on 04/19/18

5694. Rasmussen, P.E., D.E. Wilkins and C.L. Douglas Jr.. 1985. Annual-crop spring barley response to nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 738, p. 33-34.
Annual cropping is often possible where annual precipitation exceeds 14 inches. It is recommended on soils less than 4 ft deep since the soil profile normally is filled by a single winter's rainfall. Rotation of winter wheat with a spring cereal is often preferred to continuous winter wheat because weed control is easier and stubble more manageable. Fertilizer needs increase sharply under annual cropping because nutrient buildup by fallowing is eliminated and competition for nutrients by residue-decomposing organisms is more intense. In this study, nitrogen, phosphorous and sulfur response by spring barley was determined for annual-crop conventional and minimum tillage.

3725. Koehler, F.E.. 1959. Fertilizer interactions in wheat producing areas of eastern Washington.. Proceedings, 10th Ann. Fert. Conf. PNW, Tacoma, WA, p.19-21.
The most frequently observed nutrient interaction in the wheat producing area of eastern Washington is that between sulfur and nitrogen under annual cropping. Where no sulfur was added, yields were increased by about 8 bushels per acre, and 30 lbs N/ac resulted in slightly better yields than did 120 lbs. When one lb sulfur was added per acre, yield increases from nitrogen were about 15 bu/ac, and again there was little difference between the effects of 30 and 120 lbs of N. However, where the sulfur rate was 10 lbs/ac, the yield increase with 30 lb N was 20 bu/ac and that with 120 lb N was 30 bu/ac. In no case did sulfur alone appreciably increase yields.

3865. Leggett, G.E.. 1959. Relationships between wheat yield, available moisture and available nitrogen in eastern Washington dryland areas.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #609.
The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the relationships which exist between (1) available moisture and wheat yield and (2) available nitrogen and wheat yield. Using these relationships, it is possible to calculate the amount of fertilizer nitrogen necessary to obtain maximum wheat yield if the supply of available nitrogen in the soil and the amount of moisture available for the crop can be estimated. The results of 90 fertility experiments conducted on dryland wheat in eastern Washington during the period 1953-1957 were used to determine the relationship between wheat yield and available moisture. The results of 62 experiements were used to determine the relationship between wheat yields and available nitrogen. It is possible to calculate nitrogen fertilize recommendations from the results of soil tests for nitrate-nitrogen and available soil moisture by use of these relationships.

5632. Ramig, R.E., P.E. Rassmussen, R.R. Allmaras and C.M. Smith.. 1975. Nitrogen - sulfur relations in soft winter wheat. I. Yield response to fertilizer and residual sulfur.. Agronomy J. 67(2):219-223.
This study measured yield response of wheat to S applied with a range of N for the first crop and monitored residual S effects on yields of 3 subsequent crops. Significant N to S relationships were found. The first crop did not respond to S when N was deficient or optimal. Residual S increased straw yield in all crops and grain yield in 1 of 4 trials for the second crop, 3 of 3 trials for the third crop, and 2 of 2 trials for the fourth crop. Wheat response to residual S was influenced by N rates applied to the first wheat crop. High N and S fertilization resulted in early drought and lower yelds. Gradual release of residual S from recent organic matter apparently provided S at a rate adequate for efficient water use and maximum yield. T: Grain and straw yield response to S and N in first through fourth wheat crop following fertilization. The initial and residual effects of S on grain yield of wheat receiving optimum N.

5744. Rasmussen, P.E., R.E. Ramig, R.R. Allmaras and C.M. Smith.. 1975. Nitrogen - sulfur relations in soft white winter wheat. II. Initial and residual effects of sulfur application on nutrient uptake and N/S ratio.. Agronomy J. 67(2):224-228.
This study determined S and N uptake and distribution in soft white winter wheat fertilized with S in combination with deficient, optimum, and excessive N. Residual uptake from 17, 34, and 68 kg of applied S/ha was evaluated in 3 subsequent wheat crops receiving optimum N fertilization. S uptake and concentration in the first crop was proportional to the rate applied, but accumulated primarily in vegetative tissue when present in excess of the amount required for grain protein. Uptake from residual S was lower than from applied S. Grain yield responses to S were poorly correlated with S concentration or N/S ratios in tissue, because of inconsistancy of S accumulation in plant parts and the dominant effect of N on yield. T: Effect of N and S fertilization on S concentration and uptake at 3 stages of growth in a first wheat crop. Effect of residual S on grain yield and S concentration in grain and straw of second, third, and fourth crops. Relationship between S concentration in mature whole plants and grain yield receiving optimum N fertilization.

5973. Roth, G.W., R.H. Fox, and H.G. Marshall. 1989. Plant tissue tests for predicting nitrogen fertilizer requirements of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 81:502-507.
Three plant tissue tests for estimating supplemental N for winter wheat were evaluated: stem nitrate concentration, whole-plant N concentration, and crop uptake N. The whole plant test accounted for the most variation in relative yields, had the lowest spatial variability, and appeared to be best suited for the current wheat management system in PA. The stem nitrate test was most sensitive to short-term changes in soil N supply.

6301. Singh, R.A., O.P. Singh and M. Singh. 1976. Effect of soil compaction and nitrogen placement on weed populations.. Plant and Soil, 44:87-96.
Field experiements showed that soil compaction did not affect wheat yield significantly under rainfed conditions. Weed population was significantly reduced due to soil compaction. Compaction decreased total moisture use and increased water use efficiency. Weed population was not affected due to nitrogen placement. Under rainfed conditions, deep placement of nitrogen was important for increasing the efficiency of fertilizer as well as water utilization by wheat crop.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us