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Monday, October 15, 2018

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Search results on 10/15/18

2043. Fowler, D.B. and J. Brydon. 1989. No-till winter wheat production on the Canadian prairies: placement of urea and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.. Agron. J. 81:518-524.
A practical snow management system, which utilizes no-till seeding into standing stubble immediately after harvest, has permitted expansion of winter wheat production in western Canada. This study examined grain responses to urea and ammonium nitrate fertilizer banded and broadcast at seeding, or broadcast in the late fall or early spring. A moisture shortage biased the results. Fall banding prior to seeding helped reduce volatilization losses of urea (which were as much as 50%), but presented other problems and did not outperform broadcast ammonium nitrate.

2756. Huggins, D.R., W.L. Pan, and J.L. Smith. 1989. Improving yield, percent protein, and N use efficiency of no-till hard red spring wheat through crop rotation and fall N fertilization.. Proceedings, 40th Far West Fertilizer Conference,.
In a field experiment near Pullman, WA, all fall and split fall-spring N applications significantly increased percent protein and N uptake efficiency as compared to all spring applications, while yields were unaffected. Protein increase was attributed to enhanced late season uptake, due to better positional availability of deep soil N. In another experiment, yield of hard red spring wheat was 10% greater when no-tilled into Austrian winter pea stubble (for seed) as compared to winter wheat stubble, while grain N and percent protein were not affected. The difference in yield was not eliminated by optimized N rates, indicating other rotation effects.

3652. Kmoch, H.G., R.E. Ramig, R.L. Fox, and F.E. Koehler. 1957. Root development of winter wheat as influenced by soil moisture and nitrogen fertilization.. Agronomy J. 49:20-25.
Although there was little top growth in November, root development was extensive for all moisture treatments. Roots which developed under less favorable moisture conditions were finer and had more and longer branches. April samples revealed that the primary root system was in the process of decay. Living roots were generally confined to regions of moist soil. Total weight of roots was highest where nitrogen had been applied. June samples revealed roots to a depth of 13 feet where moisture conditions were favorable. There was evidence of moisture depletion to a depth of 8'. N fertilizer increased root weights and moisture utilization at all moisture levels.

5973. Roth, G.W., R.H. Fox, and H.G. Marshall. 1989. Plant tissue tests for predicting nitrogen fertilizer requirements of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 81:502-507.
Three plant tissue tests for estimating supplemental N for winter wheat were evaluated: stem nitrate concentration, whole-plant N concentration, and crop uptake N. The whole plant test accounted for the most variation in relative yields, had the lowest spatial variability, and appeared to be best suited for the current wheat management system in PA. The stem nitrate test was most sensitive to short-term changes in soil N supply.

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