WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, July 16, 2018

Search CROPSYS

Browse on keywords: fertility legume pea

Use a different search term

Search results on 07/16/18

4022. Mahler, R.L.. 1990. Nitrogen database project - final report.. unpublished report for Dryland Cereal/Legume LISA project.
This project had two components: 1) development of a comprehensive database on winter wheat response to nitrogen fertilizer rates; 2) evaluation of the potential of peas, alfalfa, and wheat straw as nitrogen sources for a following wheat crop in rotation. The database study examined winter wheat yield response to 41 nitrogen rates. When soil test N + mineralizable N + fertilizer N ranged from 101 to 175 kg/ha, a requirement of 2.75 lb N per bushel of wheat was calculated. This agrees with the figure calculated by Leggett in the 1950's, indicating that modern varieties have not changed in their basic nitrogen requirement, when nitrogen fertilizer efficiency is assumed to be 50%. At total available N rates greater than 175 kg/ha, the N requirement per bushel of wheat increased dramatically. Low rates did not show a large increase in efficiency on a per bushel basis. At Moscow, N fertilizer application rates less than 95 kg/ha resulted in greater than 50% N use efficiency. Efficiency declined rapidly at rates above this. The green manure study compared alfalfa, pea, and green wheat straw residues applied at 1, 2, and 3 mt/ha. In general, higher rates of pea and alfalfa resulted in higher wheat yields. The highest yields were with the high rate of pea residue. It was more effective than alfalfa residue, probably due to faster decomposition. Alfalfa provided more N per ton of residue (31 kg/mt) than the peas (29 kg/mt), while straw added 19 kg/mt.

4621. Muehlbauer, F.J. and R.F. Dudley. 1974. Seeding rate and P placement for Alaska peas in the Palouse.. WSU Coop. Ext. Bull. #794.
Studied seeding rate and placement; optimum seeding rate seemed to be 150 lb.ac; when soil P was higher than 4.8 ppm, no yield response; banded P was effective when soil test was low. T: seeding rate, P fertilization.

7161. Vandecaveye, S.C. and W.H. Fuller. 1941. Studies of different cultures of Rhizobium leguminosarum and of gypsum and straw for seed pea production.. Iowa St. College Journal of Sci. 15(4):415-423.
Tested 7 cultures of Rhizobium for nodulation and yield of Alaska seed peas. Also did a pot study with wheat straw and gypsum amendments. The field soil had never had peas before, but contained sufficient Rhizobium to inoculate peas. Seed inoculation tended to increase yields, but no culture was a sufficiently good N fixer to insure vigorous growth on soils low in available N. Soil amendments did not affect nodulation or growth. Yield differences were primarily due to variation in soil productivity.

8522. Kephart, K.D. and G.A. Murray. 1989. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and moisture effects on acclimation of winter peas.. Can. J. Plant Sci. 69:1119-1128.
Increased residual soil nitrogen and compaction-related waterlogging problems may relate to observed reductions in Austrian winter pea winter survival by influencing cold tolerance development. Increased nitrogen reduced survival, while phosphorus had no influence. Higher moisture was correlated with higher lethal temperatures.

Use a different search term

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us