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Saturday, January 20, 2018

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754. Bennett, W., D. Pittman, D. Tingey, D. McAllister, H. Peterson, and I. Sampson. 1954. Fifty years of dry land research (at the Nephi Field Station).. Utah Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 371.
Summarizes the results of 50 yr of research at the Nephi Field Station in cental Utah. Discusses climate - spring rainfall crucial, fall emergence of wheat correlated to high yields. Ave. annual precipitation is 12.65 in. Tillage experiments - fall verus spring plowing did not affect yields, while late spring plowing lowered yields. Plowing to 8" depth increased yields by 8% compared to plowing at 5". Yields were higher with plowing and no further cultivation on fallow (weeds controlled) than with normal fallow tillage. Yields were poor with stubble mulch. Fertility: A pea green manure increased wheat yields both in the short and long term. Wheat yields were sometimes depressed by green manure, due to moisture shortage or N immobilization. Manure application increased wheat yields in all treatments, and was more beneficial in wet years. N fertilizer increased wheat yields and protein. Burning straw increased yields for 30 yr, then they began to decline. No response to P. Wheat-fallow gave the greatest yields and net returns, and wheat was the only crop distinctly benefitted by summerfallow. Alfalfa depressed the following wheat yields but improved soil fertility. Continuous wheat yielded less than 40% of wheat-fallow. Wheatgrasses showed potential for forage and seed. Spring wheats yielded 60% of winter wheat. Only 32% of rainfall was stored as soil moisture in summerfallow. Overall, yields were low (15-25 bu/ac) and treatment differences were small (1-3 bu). These results predate the semidwarf wheat varieties.

6729. Stewart, R.. 1910. The nitrogen and humus problem in dryland farming.. Utah Ag. Exp. Sta. Bull. #109.
A brief review of literature describes the problem. For example, when summer fallow was practiced, six times as much N was lost by other processes as would have been removed by plant food (Snyder, Minn. Exp. Sta. Bulls 30, 41, 53, 65, 70). The author surveyed 10 farms and concluded: wheat crops did not decrease N or humus in the surface foot of soil. The second foot of soil contained less N and humus. Alfalfa caused a decrease in N and humus over adjacent virgin soil. The author hypothesizes that N was removed from lower soil depths and that C was generated from grain crop residue.

9284. Bracken, A.F. and G. Stewart. 1930. A quarter century of dry farm eExperiments at Nephi, Utah.. Utah Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 222, Logan, UT..
Dry farming began in Boxelder County in 1863 and has now extended to all parts of the state where precipitation and topography permit favorable development. Alternate cropping with fall or early spring planting is the general practice. On page 41, there is a summary of results covering the following subjects: weather, data, treatment of land before plowing, plowing, treatment of summer fallow seeding experiments, cropping experiments, cereal varieties, fertility experiments, and rotations.

11194. Dregne, H.E. and W.O. Willis (eds.). 1983. Dryland Agriculture.. Agronomy Monograph No. 23, Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.
This volume presents a thorough review of current dryland farming practices throughout the western United States and Canada. It covers water conservation, soil conservation, cropping practices, pests, and socioeconomics. The chapters are fully referenced.

11214. Unger, P.W., W.R. Jordan, T.V. Sneed, and R.W. Jensen. 1988. Challenges in Dryland Agriculture: A Global Perspective.. Proc. Intl. Conf. on Dryland Farming, Bushland, TX, Aug. 15-19, 1988..
The proceedings consists of more than 280 scientific papers on dryland farming. Subject areas include sustainability, soil erosion, water conservation, agroclimatology, soil fertility, residue management, socioeconomic issues, environmental issues, cropping systems, and crop/livestock systems.

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