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Sunday, December 16, 2018

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9609. Freyman, S. and M.S. Kaldy. 1979. Relationship of soil fertility to cold hardiness of winter wheat crowns.. Can. J. Plant Science 59:853-855..
In two controlled-environment experiments, N fertilizer applied to a Dark Brown prairie soil decreased cold hardiness of winter wheat, while P applied in the absence of N had little effect. When applied together, P counteracted the effect of N and produced plants as hardy as those that had received no fertilizer. The soil was rich in K; consequently applicaton of additional amounts of this element had no effect on cold hardiness. The correlation coefficient between dry weight of crowns and cold hardiness was not significant, but that between water content and LT was highly significant.

493. Arthur, Tom. Feb. 1989. Precision application with Spud-Tech.. American Vegetable Grower, p. 14-17..
A Wisconsin company has developed a computer software system and variable fertilizer applicator for use on farm fields. Soil samples are taken for every 2.3 acres to generate a nutrient map, which is loaded into a PROM chip. The chip is inserted into the on-board computer on the Spud-Nik applicator rig, which can vary the rates of six different materials. Both fertilizer and pesticides can be varied according to soil parameters.

2033. Fowler, D.B. and J. Brydon. 1989. No-till winter wheat production on the Canadian Prairies: timing of nitrogen fertilization.. Agron. J. 81:817-825.
Tested the effect of timing of a broadcast application of ammonium sulfate on grain and protein yield and protein concentration. Lower grain yield, grain protein yield and grain protein concentration were attributed to loss of fall applied N in four trials. Increased grain protein concentration was often associated with delayed N availability. Reduced grain and grain protein yield, and increased grain protein concentration were observed for fall and early spring N applications in trials that experienced favorable spring weather followed by a prolonged drought.

2043. Fowler, D.B. and J. Brydon. 1989. No-till winter wheat production on the Canadian prairies: placement of urea and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.. Agron. J. 81:518-524.
A practical snow management system, which utilizes no-till seeding into standing stubble immediately after harvest, has permitted expansion of winter wheat production in western Canada. This study examined grain responses to urea and ammonium nitrate fertilizer banded and broadcast at seeding, or broadcast in the late fall or early spring. A moisture shortage biased the results. Fall banding prior to seeding helped reduce volatilization losses of urea (which were as much as 50%), but presented other problems and did not outperform broadcast ammonium nitrate.

5973. Roth, G.W., R.H. Fox, and H.G. Marshall. 1989. Plant tissue tests for predicting nitrogen fertilizer requirements of winter wheat.. Agron. J. 81:502-507.
Three plant tissue tests for estimating supplemental N for winter wheat were evaluated: stem nitrate concentration, whole-plant N concentration, and crop uptake N. The whole plant test accounted for the most variation in relative yields, had the lowest spatial variability, and appeared to be best suited for the current wheat management system in PA. The stem nitrate test was most sensitive to short-term changes in soil N supply.

8354. Veseth, R.. 1990. Winter wheat nitrogen management in the 18-25 inch precipitation zone.. STEEP Extension Conservation Farming Update, Spring 1990, p. 9-11..
In this rainfall zone, treatments with 25-50% if the N banded below the seed at planting and the remaining N spring broadcast, produced significantly higher yield and N use efficiencies when compared to the average of all other treatments. At the lower precipitation, more N should be fall-applied than in the wetter areas. Banding avoids some of the weed stimulation caused by broadcast N applications.

8402. Gardner, H. and N.R. Goetze. 1980. Winter wheat - non-irrigated Columbia Plateau.. OSU Fertilizer Guide FG54, OSU Extension Service, Corvallis, OR F.
Soil sampling is recommended for 0-2' and 2-6' depths. A table indicating N fertilizer needs is included, to be used with soil test results. Suggestions are also made for P and S.

8412. Pumphrey, F.V. and P.E. Rasmussen. 1982. Winter wheat fertilization in the northeast intermountain region of Oregon.. OSU AES Circular of Information 691, OSU, Corvallis, OR.
Early spring application of N is more effective than preplant. Rates can be reduced up to 50%. Most wheat needs S fertilizer (15-30 lb/ac) if N is added. Most soils supply enough P for high yields. There have not been significant yield responses to potassium or trace elements.

8522. Kephart, K.D. and G.A. Murray. 1989. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and moisture effects on acclimation of winter peas.. Can. J. Plant Sci. 69:1119-1128.
Increased residual soil nitrogen and compaction-related waterlogging problems may relate to observed reductions in Austrian winter pea winter survival by influencing cold tolerance development. Increased nitrogen reduced survival, while phosphorus had no influence. Higher moisture was correlated with higher lethal temperatures.

9617. Grant, C.A., E.H. Stobbe and G.J. Racz. 1984. The effect of N and P fertilization on winter survival of winter wheat under zero-tilled and conventionally tilled management.. Can. J. Soil Science 64:293-296..
A preliminary field study was conducted to investigate the influence of fall applications of nitrogen and phosphorus on winter survival of winter wheat on zero-tilled and conventionally tilled land. Nitrogen fertilization tended to decrease winter survival while phosphorus fertilization tended to increase survival. A N-P interaction was observed, with the derease in survival in response to added N being more evident in the absense of applied P. Balanced N-P fertilization may therefore result in highest winter survival in both conventionally tilled and zero-tilled winter wheat.

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