WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Friday, January 19, 2018

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Search results on 01/19/18

3288. Pan, W.L. and A.G. Hopkins. 1991. Plant development, and N and P use of winter barley. I Evidence of water stress-induced P deficiency in an eroded toposequence.. Plant Soil 135:9-19.
Winter barley was grown at three landscape positions of a representative toposequence in the Palouse region to identify soil factors which limit plant development and nutrient use efficiency in the eroded slope positions. Subsurface P was severely deficient at eroded ridgetop and sideslope positions. Drying of surface soil during the growing season prevented roots from using much surface applied P. This moisture stress-induced P deficiency suggests that deep placement of P is needed to build subsoil P levels for enhanced productivity on these eroded sites.

5292. Pine Creek SWCD.. 1966. 25 years of conservation progress. Annual report.. Pine Creek SWCD, Whitman Co., WA.
Lists changes in farming practices over the years; shows an example of a farmer hauling topsoil from ditches back up on eroded hills; also describes the tremendous response of Gaines wheat to N and P application, and the increased stubble residue levels.

10287. Bhatti, A.U., D.J. Mulla, and B.E. Frazier. 1991. Estimation of soil properties and wheat yields on complex eroded hills using geostatistics and thematic mapper images.. Remote Sensing Environ. 37:181-191.
Spatial variability of organic carbon, soil P, and wheat yields was measured in eastern Washington using classical statistics and geostatistics. Organic carbon content was estimated from Landsat Thematic Mapper images. Goestatistics revealed strong spatial correlations relative to classical statistics. The spatial patterns were associated with changes in surface organic matter content across the landscape resulting from extensive erosion.

10406. Pan, W.L. and A.G. Hopkins. 1991. Plant development, and N and P use of winter barley. II. Responses to tillage and N management across eroded toposequences.. Plant Soil 135:21-29.
Winter barley was grown at three landscape positions of a representative toposequence in the Palouse region. Direct drilling (no-till) into crop residues increased yields by 16% over conventional tillage at an eroded ridgetop position, despite early season growth inhibition. Tillage system had no effect on grain production at other landscape positions that featured higher overall yields. Short-term benefits of no-till systems may be most evident at slope positions where water use is most limited.

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