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Thursday, September 20, 2018

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1180. Campbell, C.A., R.P. Zentner and P.J. Johnson. 1988. Effect of crop rotation and fertilization on the quantitative relationship between spring wheat yields, available soil moisture, and precipitation.. Canadian J. Soil Sci., 68(1):1-16.
The effects of crop rotation and fertilization on the quantitative relationship between spring wheat yields, available soil moisture, and growing season precipitation were determined. Stubble-seeded wheat required 68 mm of moisture to produce the first kilogram per hectare of grain; fallow-seeded wheat required about 46mm. The lower threshold level of MU for grain production decreased from about 140mm to the values cited above; this has resulted in substantially greater moisture use efficiency in recent years likely due to better, more timely crop mangement and the improved cereal varieties.

1608. Doneen, L.D.. 1934. Nitrogen in relation to composition, growth and yield of wheat.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #296.
On soil with adequate N, adding sodium nitrate retarded wheat growth. The carbohydrate - N ratio of plant tissue was not affected by fertilizer treatment or variety. Under extreme conditions (e.g. variations in N or moisture) there were considerable differences in varietal adaptations. The addition of N after normal tillering caused production of new tillers and increased yields. Fall fertilization led to higher water use and spring moisture deficit. T: many tables. e.g.: Composition of total sugar, non-coagulate nitrogen, amino N, and nitrate on wheat grown under various soil treatments. Yield of grain and straw of wheat treated with sodium N. N removed from soil by grain and straw of wheat treated with different amounts of sodium N/ac. Yield of grain and straw of wheat treated with 500 lb. sodium N/ac.

3524. Kardos, L.T.. 1948. Lysimeter studies with cultivated and virgin soils under subhumid rainfall conditions.. Soil Science, 65:367-381.
Pullman, WA study. Lateral flow beneath the soil was significant, enough to cause erosion, but none was noticed. Less silaceous and compact layers in virgin soil. Total N in leachate water tended to be higher from the cultivated plot - cultivated ranged from 1-15 ppm, virgin 2-3 ppm. 2-5 times more total solids in cultivated leachate. Nitrate N higher from cultivated. Nitrate N leaching subsurface from slopes and concentrated in basins. Does not occur on virgin area. Subsurface leaching 20-30 inches below surface. W-P rotation encouraged erosion loss and subsurface nutrient loss. T: leachate chemical analysis.

3865. Leggett, G.E.. 1959. Relationships between wheat yield, available moisture and available nitrogen in eastern Washington dryland areas.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #609.
The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the relationships which exist between (1) available moisture and wheat yield and (2) available nitrogen and wheat yield. Using these relationships, it is possible to calculate the amount of fertilizer nitrogen necessary to obtain maximum wheat yield if the supply of available nitrogen in the soil and the amount of moisture available for the crop can be estimated. The results of 90 fertility experiments conducted on dryland wheat in eastern Washington during the period 1953-1957 were used to determine the relationship between wheat yield and available moisture. The results of 62 experiements were used to determine the relationship between wheat yields and available nitrogen. It is possible to calculate nitrogen fertilize recommendations from the results of soil tests for nitrate-nitrogen and available soil moisture by use of these relationships.

7850. Koala, S.. 1982. Adaptation of Australian ley farming to Montana dryland cereal production.. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Plant and Soil Sci., Montana St. Univ., Bozeman, MT 59717.
This study examined the potential to adapt the ley farming system used in Australia to dryland cereal production in Montana. The ley system alternates a grain crop with a self-seeding forage legume. The legumes tested in this study included 5 Australian medics, 7 subclovers, 2 lupins, fababean, and a native Montana black medic. One full cycle of the system was completed. All grain yields (spring wheat) were higher after the legumes than after fallow. Soil water to 120 cm was similar in all plots at wheat planting. The black medic treatment had the highest water use efficiency (100 kg grain/cm) and fallow the lowest (55 kg grain/cm). There were higher levels of soil nitrate after the legumes than after fallow. Re-establishment of the legumes after wheat ranged from 3 to 93% ground cover, with black medic being the highest. Overall, black medic from Montana performed best in this study.

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