WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

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Search results on 10/17/18

935. Bolton, F.E.. 1990. Starter fertilizer trials - no-til.. Sherman Station Field Days, OSU, Moro, OR.
The use of starter fertilizer, including N, P, and S in various combinations, was examined for no-till winter wheat and winter barley. Variable results occurred, but yield increased were measured in most years. About 3 out of 5 times, the increase was economically feasible. Overall yields under no-till averaged equal to or slightly lower than conventional tillage.

272. Allmaras, R.R., K. Ward, P.E. Rasmussen and C.R. Rohde.. 1978. Soil acidification from long-term use of ammonium-type nitrogen fertilizers.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Progress Report Misc. #78-4, p.55-58.
Long term use of ammonium fertilizers has reduced pH in the plowlayer in proportion to the rate of application; no noticeable difference in 12-18 zone of soil; about 50% of the applied fertilizer was lost, perhaps by denitrification; 1 T of pure limestone raised the pH by 0.5 unit; liming to pH 6.2 improved pea growth and increased soil water storage; potential increase infiltration and reduce erosion with liming. T: pH x depth, N rate, lime requirement.

961. Bolton, F.E.. 1988. Liquid starter fertilizers on winter wheat and barley in no-till plantings.. Columbia Basin Agr. Res. Sta. Special Report #827, p.33.
Liquid starter fertilizer on winter wheat and barley in no-till plantings.

1077. Broadbent, F.E. and F.J. Stevenson. 1966. Organic matter interactions.. Agricultural anhydrous ammonia: technology and use. p. 169-197..

3865. Leggett, G.E.. 1959. Relationships between wheat yield, available moisture and available nitrogen in eastern Washington dryland areas.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #609.
The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the relationships which exist between (1) available moisture and wheat yield and (2) available nitrogen and wheat yield. Using these relationships, it is possible to calculate the amount of fertilizer nitrogen necessary to obtain maximum wheat yield if the supply of available nitrogen in the soil and the amount of moisture available for the crop can be estimated. The results of 90 fertility experiments conducted on dryland wheat in eastern Washington during the period 1953-1957 were used to determine the relationship between wheat yield and available moisture. The results of 62 experiements were used to determine the relationship between wheat yields and available nitrogen. It is possible to calculate nitrogen fertilize recommendations from the results of soil tests for nitrate-nitrogen and available soil moisture by use of these relationships.

4077. Mason, J.L. and J.E. Miltimore. 1959. Increase in yield and protein content of native bluebunch wheatgrass from nitrogen fertilization.. Canadian J. Plant Sci. 39:501-504.
Native bluebunch wheatgrass in Okanagan Valley (11" precip.) showed marked response to nitrogen fertilization. Dry matter production doubled with 60N added as ammonium nitrate, protein increased from 3.9 to 6.2 %. Fertilizer also increased ground cover by the desirable grasses.

8402. Gardner, H. and N.R. Goetze. 1980. Winter wheat - non-irrigated Columbia Plateau.. OSU Fertilizer Guide FG54, OSU Extension Service, Corvallis, OR F.
Soil sampling is recommended for 0-2' and 2-6' depths. A table indicating N fertilizer needs is included, to be used with soil test results. Suggestions are also made for P and S.

8412. Pumphrey, F.V. and P.E. Rasmussen. 1982. Winter wheat fertilization in the northeast intermountain region of Oregon.. OSU AES Circular of Information 691, OSU, Corvallis, OR.
Early spring application of N is more effective than preplant. Rates can be reduced up to 50%. Most wheat needs S fertilizer (15-30 lb/ac) if N is added. Most soils supply enough P for high yields. There have not been significant yield responses to potassium or trace elements.

9240. Alessi, J. and J.F. Power. 1980. Effects of banded and residual fertilizer phosphorus on dryland spring wheat yield in the Northern Plains.. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. J. 44:792-796..
Although phosphate fertilizers are commonly applied either by surface broadcasting or banding with the seed to dryland spring wheat, data are limited on the residual effects of previous fertilization on plant growth and drought periods during the growing season. Therefore, the residual effects of P fertilization on spring wheat grown on Parshall fine sandy loam were determined in a field study at Mandan, North Dakota.

9658. Klepper, B., P.E. Rasmussen and R.W. Rickman. 1983. Fertilizer placement for cereal root access.. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation (May/June) p. 250-252..
Conservation tillage, which involves surface crop residue often results in seedbed and near-surface soil environments that are not always as suitable as they might be for growth of cereal grain seedlings. Microbial decomposition of surface residue or partially incorporated residue immobilizes mineral nutrients, particularly nitrogen. Placing fertilizer deep in the soil usually offsets the immobilization effects some, but proper location is important for maximum root access by young plants. Small amounts of starter fertilizer can be banded with the seed. Applying the entire crop requirement, however, may delay or stop seed development. Fertilizer injury to roots - Placement of fertilizer too close to a seed can delay emergence and injure seedling. The injury is usually to the tips of the first three seminal roots. Optimum fertilizer placement - Farmers should place nutrients below residue accumulation zones for most efficient crop use. A distance of 3 to 5 cm below and up to 5 cm to one side is sufficient in a silt loam soil.

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