WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, April 23, 2018

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Search results on 04/23/18

9658. Klepper, B., P.E. Rasmussen and R.W. Rickman. 1983. Fertilizer placement for cereal root access.. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation (May/June) p. 250-252..
Conservation tillage, which involves surface crop residue often results in seedbed and near-surface soil environments that are not always as suitable as they might be for growth of cereal grain seedlings. Microbial decomposition of surface residue or partially incorporated residue immobilizes mineral nutrients, particularly nitrogen. Placing fertilizer deep in the soil usually offsets the immobilization effects some, but proper location is important for maximum root access by young plants. Small amounts of starter fertilizer can be banded with the seed. Applying the entire crop requirement, however, may delay or stop seed development. Fertilizer injury to roots - Placement of fertilizer too close to a seed can delay emergence and injure seedling. The injury is usually to the tips of the first three seminal roots. Optimum fertilizer placement - Farmers should place nutrients below residue accumulation zones for most efficient crop use. A distance of 3 to 5 cm below and up to 5 cm to one side is sufficient in a silt loam soil.

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