WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Wednesday, March 21, 2018


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Search results on 03/21/18

10338. Morrow, L.. 1992. Chloride fertilizers.. Growers Guide, Feb. 1992, p.A6.
Chloride is provided when KCl fertilizers are used. It affects photosynthesis, enzyme activation, cation transport, stomatal activities and other processes. In soil, Cl inhibits the conversion of ammonium to nitrate. This maintains a lower pH near the root. Cl increases the number of non-pathogenic organisms in the rhizosphere. Cl competes with nitrate for plant uptake, and reduces plant nitrate levels, which can also reduce certain plant diseases. Take-all, tanspot, stripe rust, septoria, leaf rust, and common root rot have all bee suppressed by chloride.

943. Bolton, F.E.. 1988. Source and method of nitrogen fertilizer and herbicide applications in winter wheat, Moro, 1987.. Columbia Basin Agr. Res. Sta. Special Report #827, p.35.
Source and method of nitrogen fertilizer and herbicide applications in winter wheat, Moro 1987.

2898. Idaho Agr. Expt. Sta.. 1940. Annual Report. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #236.
Borax gave yield increase in alfalfa on cut-over land in north Idaho - 50% yield increase in second year from a 40 lb/ac application.

3117. Rasmussen, P.E.. 1989. unpublished data on soil pH from long-term plots at Pendleton, OR. Columbia Basin Agr. Res. Center, P.O. Box 370, Pendleton, OR 97801.
Plots have received various tillage and fertility treatments since 1931. The original pH (1:2 water) was 6.3. Addition of 10 T/ac manure every other year raised the pH to 6.9, while addition of 1 T/ac pea vines raised it to 6.5. Fall burn lowered the pH to 6.2. The decline in soil pH was essentially linear with increasing total N fertilizer added over the years. A nearby permanent pasture had a pH of 7.3.

3885. Leggett, G.E., H.M. Reisenauer and W.L. Nelson. 1959. Fertilization of dryland wheat in eastern Washington.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #602.
This bulletin presents the results of 5 yrs of experimenting with the fertilization of wheat. During 1953-1957, 112 fertility experiments were conducted on dry land wheat throughout eastern Washington. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased yields in 92 of the 112 experiments conducted. Whether nitrogen fertilization increased wheat yields depended largely on the amount of moisture available to the crop. Because of the decline in soil organic matter through years of cropping, the amount of available N released by soils is no longer adequate to support high wheat yields. The introduction of high yield varieties and improved tillage has increased yield potential, and this has increased the demand for N. Application rates (lb N/ac): <10" rainfall - 20-40; 10-15" - 20-60; >15" - 30-80. Different types of N fertilizer did not change yields. T: Summary of the effects of N on wheat yields, 1953-57; effect of N on yield from fallow ground.

3982. Mahler, R.L. and R.E. McDole. 1981. Boron in Idaho.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #608.
North Idaho soils typically respond to boron; areas in south and SE Idaho may also benefit; a potential problem in legume forages, seldom a response in cereals

4694. Murray, G.A.. 1976. N-serve and its potential use in northern Idaho.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #313.
Nitrification inhibitor; apply with anhydrous or aqua ammonia; must be incorporated; use rate of 1/2-1 qt/ac; most effective on forest-type soils, with a clay layer; not effective when used in spring; cost about $3.50/ac; not recommended for deep Palouse type soils. T: wheat yields, N rates.

5197. Peterson, P.P.. 1918. Soils of Latah County, Idaho.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #107.
Notes the great power of the soil to absorb falling rain; little cropping before 1870; native bunchgrass provided good spring pasture for cattle; history - 1887 first railroad to Genesee; very profitable line; wheat yields run as high as 70 bu/ac, seldom less than 20 bu/ac; 2 yr grain, then fallow for weed control; some interest in livestock; large farms 320-1200 ac; average 140 ac; field peas profitable in 1918; clover an option; response to S in alfalfa (gypsum 50-100 lb/ac). Low CacO3 in soil; low pH a future problem?

5735. Rasmussen, P.E. and C.R. Rohde. 1988. Stubble burning effects on winter wheat yield and N utilization under semiarid conditions.. Agronomy J. 80:940-942.
Burning vs. not burning was examined at 3 nitrogen levels over 6 years (3 crops). Burning had no effect on grain yield or grain N uptake. Burning increased straw yield when wheat was fertilized by N, but had no effect on straw N uptake. Burning did not decrease foot rot incidence or severity, but did reduce downy brome density. T: Effects of stubble burning and N fertilization on grain and straw of winter wheat 1980-85. Effect of stubble burning on foot rot infection. Effect of stubble burning on downybrome infestation.

6359. Smiley, R., D. Wilkins, W. Uddin, S. Ott, K. Rhinhart, and S. Case. 1989. Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat and barley.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 840, p. 68-79..
Rhizoctonia root rot is now considered the most severe root disease of barley in the PNW. It is more important than take-all and Pythium on wheat produced in drier areas (<16" precip.). Based on long-term plots at Pendleton, different management systems are unlikely to greatly influence the biological resistance of soils to Rhizoctonia. Rotational crops susceptible to Rhizoctonia include wheat, barley, peas, chickpeas, lentils, and rapeseed. The disease is less apparent on small grains after legumes than after cereals. Rhizoctonia damage is always highest on no-till systems, but yields may not suffer due to improved water relations under conservation tillage. Australian research indicates that applications of N and P fertilizers can reduce the disease. There appear to be detrimental herbicide interactions with Rhizoctonia, particularly Glean on high pH soils. Also, the use of glyphosate increased disease incidence, perhaps by signalling the pathogens to move from the dying plants to newly seeded ones. A delay of at least 2 weeks is suggested between chem kill and planting of a new crop.

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