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Sunday, January 21, 2018

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1699. Douglas, C.L. and P.E. Rasmussen. 1985. Rill erosion effect on wheat yield.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 738, p. 12-13.
Rill erosion does have a detrimental effect on grain yield when it occurs within the growing crop. Even small rills appear to cause a yield loss, apparently because of decreased plant survival. The estimated yield loss, if a rill occurred every 10 ft across a slope, would be 7 bushels of grain per acre. T: effect of aspect and slope steepness on grain yield and tiller density. Winter wheat yields and tiller density in rill and nonrill areas.

2735. Horner, G.M., M.M. Oveson, G.O. Baker, and W.W. Pawson.. 1960. Effect of cropping practices on yield, soil organic matter and erosion in the Pacific Northwest wheat region.. PNW Technical bulletin 1; USDA-ARS and Ag. Expt. Sta.'s of ID, OR, WA.
Summary of soil management experiments conducted over 40 yrs at six experiment stations. Covers: crop rotation, fertilization, and use of organic material. Some results: sweetclover and alfalfa were more effective than other legumes in increasing wheat yield. Yields of wheat were markedly affected by the sequences of cropping. Return of straw to soil decreased yields slightly under low N conditions. Organic and mineral N had no effect on yields in low precip. zones. Also covers runoff and erosion. T: many, eg.: effect of crop rotations on crop yield; crop yield as affected by grass/clover; effect of OM on wheat yield.

3070. Tanaka, D.L. and J.K. Aase. 1989. Influence of topsoil removal and fertilizer application on spring wheat yields.. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 53:228-232.
In 3 of 5 years, soil removal treatments reduced spring wheat yields an average of 9, 28, and 45% for 0.06, 0.12, and 0.18 m soil removal treatments, respectively, over all fertilizer treatments. The data suggest that P was the most limiting nutrient and additions of N fertilizer without P resulted in small yield increases.

3762. Krauss, H.A. and R.R. Allmaras. 1982. Technology masks the effects of soil erosion on wheat yields - A case study in Whitman County, WA.. IN: Determinants of soil loss tolerance, Am. Soc. Agron./SSSA.
This study seperates yield increases due to technological advances from yield declines due to soil erosion. The average soil productivity decrease from erosion was 10.8 bu/ac. Analysis was carried out by land capability class to reveal different erosion impacts across the landscape. Real yields are increasing on 67% of cropland, and rapidly declined on 18% of croplands. T: yields of wheat in Whitman Co. for each decade since 1936. Winter wheat production and technology inputs in Whitman Co. from 1930-1979. Sheet and rill erosion in Whitman Co. from 1940-1977. Land capability subclasses and their estimated contribution to soil erosion in Whitman Co. Soil erosion and wheat productivity changes as related to soil capability subclasses in Whitman Co. Comparison of current yield distribution with that predicted.

4377. McKay, H.C. and W.A. Moss. 1949. High protein wheat with conservation farming.. U. of Idaho Extension Bull. #181.
Emphasize need for legume - grass rotation to maintain soil productivity. Suggest a 7 yr sweet clover rotation or a 9 yr alfalfa rotation. Yellow sweet clover plus mountain bromegrass or slender wheatgrass; Ladak alfalfa plus smooth brome and big bluegrass (high rainfall) or crested wheatgrass (low rainfall); early spring seeding recommended without nurse crop; methods of establishment, plow sweetclover at 12-22" height; use sweetclover as a surface mulch to prevent erosion. T: soil moisture and sweetclover growth; wheat after sweetclover; yield and protein.

6665. Steiner, J.L., J.R. Williams, and O.R. Jones. 1987. Evaluation of the EPIC simulation model using a dryland wheat-sorghum-fallow crop rotation.. Agron. J., 79:732-738.
The Erosion-Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) simulates evapotranspiration (ET), runoff, plant growth, and related processes. EPIC was generally satisfactory in predicting the water balance over long periods of time. Satisfactory yield prediction required calibration to the location.

10287. Bhatti, A.U., D.J. Mulla, and B.E. Frazier. 1991. Estimation of soil properties and wheat yields on complex eroded hills using geostatistics and thematic mapper images.. Remote Sensing Environ. 37:181-191.
Spatial variability of organic carbon, soil P, and wheat yields was measured in eastern Washington using classical statistics and geostatistics. Organic carbon content was estimated from Landsat Thematic Mapper images. Goestatistics revealed strong spatial correlations relative to classical statistics. The spatial patterns were associated with changes in surface organic matter content across the landscape resulting from extensive erosion.

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