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Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

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2294. Greenwalt, R.N., J.L. Pikul Jr. and J.F. Zuzel. 1983. Soil frost penetration under conventional and conservation tillage.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report #680, p.20-23.
This research evaluates the effects of surface crop residues and tillage practices on overwinter soil temperatures and soil frost penetration. Soil frost penetration was significantly greater in the fall-plowed than in the no-tilled winter wheat plots because surface residues in the no-till treatment acted as a thermal insulator creating warmer soil temperatures when compared to the bare soil surface of the fall plow plot. Frost penetration was three times greater in depth and frozen soil layers were present twice as long in the conventional tillage system as compared to the conservation tillage system. Because infiltration rates can be greatly reduced when frozen soil layers are present, nearly all precipitation on frozen soil runs off or evaporates. Those tillage management techniques which leave adequate crop residues on the surface should be considered as a means to reduce or eliminate soil losses caused by soil erosion. T: Depth of soil frost penetration in fall-plow and no-till plots. Comparison of soil temperatures between the fall-plow and no-till treatments.

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