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Thursday, September 20, 2018

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1819. Elliott, L.F. (ed.). 1987. STEEP - Conservation concepts and accomplishments.. Washington State Univ. Publ., 662pp..
A compilation of 48 papers covering: tillage and plant maagement; erosion and runoff predictions; plant design; pest management; socio-economic; integrated systems; technology transfer for cropping systems; 22 technical notes. T: many

1130. Burt, O.R.. 1981. Farm level economics of soil conservation in the Palouse area of the Northwest.. Am. J. Agr. Econ. 63(1):83-85.
Results suggest that intensive wheat production under modern farming practices and heavy fertilization is the most economic cropping system in both the short and long run in the Palouse Area except under low wheat prices. In a sense, topsoil was transformed by modern technology from a primarily stock resource into a largely renewable resource for purposes of practical decisions. The issue of externalities and social costs of sedimentation and pollution in streams has been avoided purposely in this study. But, insofar as soil losses impose these additional costs on society, there exists an incentive for government to subsidize soil conservation measures and/or to penalize farming systems which are relatively erosive on the soil.

1219. Caplan, A.J.. 1986. Cost return and relative soil loss comparisons of alternative tillage systems.. MS Thesis.
Minimum tillage is less expensive than conventional. No-till is most expensive due to high chemical inputs. In the low precipitation zone, minimum till was 1.19 times less expenxive than conventional. Annual peas/wheat in high precip. zone was 1.5 times less expensive with min-till than conventional.

2635. Hoag, D., D. Taylor, and D. Young. 1984. Do acreage diversion programs encourage farming erodible land? A Palouse case study.. J. Soil Water Cons. 39:138-143.
Analysis shows that farming erodible class IVe land in the high rainfall zone of the Palouse generally covers variable costs of production even in the absence of USDA acreage reduction programs. The economic disincentives of USDA programs served to prevent conversion of these lands to permanent grass cover. Even under the CRP, farmers will continue to profit from farming this class of land.

5434. Pubols, B.H., A.E. Orr and C.P. Heisig. 1939. Farming systems and practices and their relationship to soil conservation and farm income in the wheat region of Washington.. WA State Ag. Exp. Sta. Bull. #374.
In a survey of 225 farms, different soil conservation practices were documented. "Inertia, insufficient farm income, lack of appreciation of the seriousness of the situation, or an attitude of indifference toward soil conservation even though the situation is recognized" are some of the reasons for the limited effort made to conserve soil. Some look at the situation from the short-term viewpoint and apparently have no interest in the future. T: Number of farmers reporting use of selected conservation practices.

6776. Taylor, M.C. and V.W. Baker. 1947. Economic aspects of soil conservation in the Palouse wheat-pea area.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #494.
The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the conservation program on farm income during the sixth year of a 6-yr period. The purpose was to evaluate the economic effects of the program currently recommended for the area and to contribute information for the improvement of conservation planning. It was found that there was no significant relationship of current farm income to the total conservation inputs over a 6-yr period. There was no significant or consistent relationship of crop yields or labor and machinery requirements to conservation inputs. It was noted, however, that by slight shifts in land use and farm organization the higher conservation score farmers were able to maintain net incomes comparable to those of other farmers. T: Percentage of crop land in grass-legumes on 69 sample Palouse farms by conservation score groups, 1941 to 1946. Percentage of crop land in sweetclover used as green manure crop on 69 sample Palouse farms by conservaton score groups, 1941 - 1946.

6957. USDA. 1978. Palouse cooperative river basin study.. SCS, FS, ESCS - USDA.
Excellent summary of soil erosion problem and possible management approaches in the Palouse; extensive data on land use, soil erosion, future scenarios; history of agriculture in the area; bibliography.

7424. Walker, D.J. and D.L. Young. 1982. Technical progress in yields - no substitute for soil conservation.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #671.
Technological progress increased yield damage from erosion; higher yield reduction with successive erosion; yield damage from conventional tillage in wheat-pea rotation estimated at $8 for one year; no assurance that technology will continue to offset erosion - induced yield losses; leveling off yields in the last several years. T: erosion and yield change; technology and yield.

11346. Boerboom, C. and F.L. Young. 1991. Integrated crop management for cereal/legume production in the Palouse.. Technical Report 91-3, Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State Univ., Pullman.
This report summarizes six years of a field-scale integrated crop management experiment near Pullman, WA. The study focused on weed management intensity, residue levels for conservation compliance, and economic returns. Two crop rotations, two tillage systems, and three weed management levels were used. Plant diseases, insect pests, soil microbiota and earthworms were also monitored. The study will continue several more years. It took about four years for each treatment to stabilize, pointing out the need for long-term studies. Over time, the three year rotation with conservation tillage appeared most profitable and in compliance with residue levels. The low weed management level was seldom justified by weed control, yield, or profitability considerations. Moderate to high weed management were often the most profitable, although a reduction in the soil reserve of weed seeds with high management might allow periods of less intensive management in the future.

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