WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, October 22, 2018

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3098. Swanson, Guy. 1990. Annual production of spring wheat in Montana and the Columbia Basin. Bumper Times special edition, Jan. 31, 1990; p. 6; S. 4305 University Rd., Spokane, WA 99206.
Minimum till continuous spring wheat produced the highest net returns in a Montana study. The cost of Roundup reduced net returns in no-till, although no-till had the highest gross returns. John Rae, a WA farmer, has compared continuous no-till spring wheat with his normal winter wheat-fallow system. The continuous system has produced $350/ac more gross returns over five years in his 9" rainfall area.

9923. Kendall, D.. 1989. He sets his own grain prices.. The New Farm, Jan. 1989, p. 54-59..
Zane Zell of Shelby, Montana has grown as many as 1000 acres with no purchased chemicals, and only 12" annual rainfall, while producing the same average yields as conventional farmers. Zell says the key to his fertility is the Austrian winter pea green manure crop he grows. Besides fuel, the only other purchased input he uses is rock phosphate, about every four or five years. Weed control is achieved by timely field preparation with a plow and a rod weeder. Because of the growing demand for organically grown food, Zell is sold out a month after harvest. By turning his wheat grain into flour and cleaning and bagging his speciality legumes, he is able to increase his profits by up to 350%.

10536. Krall, J.M., R.H. Delaney, and D.T. Taylor. 1991. Survey of nonirrigated crop production practices and attitudes of Wyoming producers.. J. Agron. Education 20:120-122.
Over 250 dryland farmers in Wyoming responded to a survey about their production practices. While the majority of the producers (76%) retain the winter wheat-fallow system, 29 farmers reported experimenting with rotations. Legume use was low. Over the previous five years, 44% of the farmers had attempted an alternative practice, with most producers placing environmental concerns ahead of input costs when selecting fallow practices. Nine percent did not use pesticides or fertilizers. 74% were interested in attending a meeting a low-input practices.

11165. Beus, C., D. Granatstein, and K. Painter. 1990. Prospects for sustainable agriculture in the Palouse: farmer experiences and viewpoints.. Agr. Res. Center Bull. XB1016, Washington State Univ., Pullman.
The results of interviews with 23 farmers in the Palouse region of Washington and Idaho are summarized in chapters on crop and soil management, economics and policy considerations, and social institutional factors. Farmers were chosen for their use of alternative rotations or cropping practices. The booklet illustrates some of the successful alternative practices currently used by commercial grain farmers and the economic and social motivations and consequences.

11204. Matheson, N., B. Rusmore, J.R. Sims, M. Spengler, and E.L. Michalson. 1991. Cereal-legume cropping systems: nine farm case studies in the dryland northern plains, Canadian prairies, and intermountain Northwest.. AERO, 44 N. Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59601.
The farm case studies presented in this book include details of the crop rotations, tillage, fertilization, and pest control practices used by the farms. Farms were chosen for their innovative or alternative practices. Partial budgets for each crop on each farm are presented to provide a reference point for the economic performance of alternative dryland cropping systems. Comparisons with more conventional systems are not made.

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