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Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Monday, July 23, 2018

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Search results on 07/23/18

5152. Peterson, C.L., E.L. Michalson, and K.N. Hawley. 1988. Minimum input wheat production.. Amer. Soc. Agric. Engineers Paper 88-1058.
The paper describes a computer decision support program under development at the University of Idaho to help growers determine the most economic levels of inputs. It focuses on machinery decisions and fertilizers, but requests information regarding all aspects of farm management. It can produce "what-if" scenarios, examining different production strategies under various price conditions. Minimum input farming is particularly concerned with front-end capital requirements. It is an expansion of minimum tillage to include variables beyond yield and erosion as measures of success. Lack of adequate production functions relating tillage, fertilizer and pesticide use to crop yield are a major limitation. The Idaho fertilizer guide was not useful. Two MIF field plots were set up to test the program, using reduced fertilizer and reduced tillage for MIF. Costs of production were reduced on the MIF plots, which had net returns of $0.53/bu versus $0.33/bu for the conventional plots. Most of the gain was due to the reduction in phosphate fertilizer.

10070. Mahler, R.. undated. Catena management in northern Idaho.. unpublished handout for Extension agent training.
In northern Idaho, water is often not limiting to crop production. Also, nutrient use efficiency is lower than in drier areas. Where annual precipitation is <17", fall application of all N fertilizer is best. But as rainfall increases, nutrient use efficiency can be increased by applying a greater share of N in the spring. Fertility experiments have shown that growers are probably underfertilizing bottomland positions and overfertilizing slopes for maximum net return from fertilizer. Several questions need to be answered to help improve nutrient efficiency. Is the value 2.7 lb N/bu wheat linear? Research results indicate that only 2.4 lb N/bu is needed at 80-90% of maximum yield. Is residual N used as efficienctly by plants from surface layers versus subsurface layers? What is the best approach to estimating N mineralization rates in a soil? Rates in northern Idaho can vary as much as 100% depending on weather conditions.

10814. Heim, M., R.J. Cook, and D.J. Kirpes. 1986. Economic benefits and costs of biological control of take-all to the Pacific Northwest wheat industry.. Research Bulletin 0988, Agr. Res. Center, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA.
Take-all can severely lower wheat yields. One possible control is through the use of antagonistic Pseudomonad bacteria applied to wheat seed. Disease surveys in the region verified increased disease problems with grain intensive rotations and with reduced till or no-till farming. Overall, an estimate 600,000 acres are affected by take-all in the region. Estimates of the cost of a commercial bacterial seed treatment were $14.30/ac applied. Wheat yields were assumed to increase an average of 5-10% from this. At a wheat price of $3.00/bu, a minimum 5 bu/ac increase is needed to break even on the treatment.

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