WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Sunday, December 9, 2018

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Search results on 12/09/18

1521. Davies, D.B.. 1977. Soil management. 3rd edition.. Farming Press Ltd., Suffolk..
Soil compaction increased chances of root disease (take-all, foot rot); problems of loss of soil structure; leads to reduced fertilizer use efficiency, especially N & P; winter cereals less sensitive to poor structure than spring cereals; 2-3 yr grass/alfalfa stand helps restore structure; benifits of subsoiling on silt soils; best time is when soil is dry.

10516. Short, R.. 1991. Common root rot of peas incited by Aphanomyces euteiches.. handout at Crops 510 seminar, WSU.
Aphanomyces euteiches is often the primary and dominant invading species of a pathogen complex that attacks peas, along with Fusarium, Pythium, Rhizoctonia, and Ascochyta. Aphanomyces causes 16-20 million dollars of crop loss annually in the U.S. The oospores may persist in soil for more than 20 years, making it a difficult disease to eliminate. Control of Aphanomyces demands and integrated approach due to its invasive and pervasive nature. Field sampling can help determine inoculum levels, and crop sequences can be altered. In some cases, a break of five or more years between pea crops is needed to lower inoculum levels for minimal damage. Cultural practices which reduce soil compaction and promote drainage are beneficial. Organic amendments such as crucifer green manure crops have reduced inoculum levels in infested soils. Biological control agents, such as Trichoderma and Pseudomonas, show promise. Breeding for multiple disease resistance is another important strategy.

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