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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

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1819. Elliott, L.F. (ed.). 1987. STEEP - Conservation concepts and accomplishments.. Washington State Univ. Publ., 662pp..
A compilation of 48 papers covering: tillage and plant maagement; erosion and runoff predictions; plant design; pest management; socio-economic; integrated systems; technology transfer for cropping systems; 22 technical notes. T: many

3579. Kephart, K.D. and R.E. Allan. 1988. Madsen and Hyak soft white winter wheats.. ID Agr. Expt. Sta. CIS #823.
These varieties are resistant to strawbreaker foot rot, also to 3 rust pathogens; can allow earlier fall seeding date.

8384. Beus, C., D. Dillman, and J. Carlson. 1990. Palouse agriculture: a survey on production practices, policies, and problems.. unpublished results, Dept. of Rural Sociology, Washington St. Univ., Pullman, WA 99164.
This random survey was done in the Palouse area of eastern WA and northern ID, with a random sample of about 260 farmers. Average farm size was 1392 acres. One-third of the respondents would like to change their current rotation, primarily to reduce disease problems, but consider government programs to be the biggest barrier. Desire to use no-till planting was evenly split. Half the respondents felt they were using most of the available erosion control practices. Large percentages (>60%) felt that contour tillage, surface roughness, no-till, good plant cover, and tilth were very important erosion control factors. Herbicide and fertilizer use trends over the past five years were normally distributed. Use of fungicides on wheat (other than seed treatment) was generally less than 20%. Half the farmers currently use soil testing, and of those, 90% tested for residual N to 4-5 ft. depth. Half the respondents felt they had cut back on pesticide and fertilizer use since their high point, while only 10-20% felt they would do so in the future. About 65% had heard of the LISA program, and 26% indicated opposition to it.

10814. Heim, M., R.J. Cook, and D.J. Kirpes. 1986. Economic benefits and costs of biological control of take-all to the Pacific Northwest wheat industry.. Research Bulletin 0988, Agr. Res. Center, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA.
Take-all can severely lower wheat yields. One possible control is through the use of antagonistic Pseudomonad bacteria applied to wheat seed. Disease surveys in the region verified increased disease problems with grain intensive rotations and with reduced till or no-till farming. Overall, an estimate 600,000 acres are affected by take-all in the region. Estimates of the cost of a commercial bacterial seed treatment were $14.30/ac applied. Wheat yields were assumed to increase an average of 5-10% from this. At a wheat price of $3.00/bu, a minimum 5 bu/ac increase is needed to break even on the treatment.

10931. Cook, R.J., J.W. Sitton, and W.A. Haglund. 1987. Influence of soil treatments on growth and yield of wheat and implications for control of Pythium root rot.. Phytopathology 77:1192-1198.
Thirty-three of 39 wheat fields sampled in eastern Washington from 1983-1986 had high levels of Pythium spp. Soil fumigation eliminated 95-99% of the inoculum and resulted in adult wheat plants that were 3-10 cm taller than those grown in nontreated soil. Solarization and straw burning eliminated 80-90 and 40-50% of the Pythium inoculum respectively and resulted in taller plants. Wheat yields were 13-36% greater in response to fumigation in fields where wheat was grown every other year, 3-12% greater where wheat was grown every third year and 19 and 14% greater respectively in response to solarization and burning.

11017. Cook, R.J.. 1986. Wheat management systems in the Pacific Northwest.. Plant Disease 70(9):894-898.
Strategies for reducing disease problems and increasing yields closer to potentials of the site are described for four agroecosystems: rainfed wheat-fallow, rainfed annual crop; irrigated; western OR and WA.

11057. Cook, R.J.. 1980. Fusarium foot rot of wheat and its control in the Pacific Northwest.. Plant Disease 64:1061-1066.
Fusarium foot rot occurs mainly in low to intermediate rainfall areas of the PNW (20-40 cm) where wheat is grown after fallow. The disease appears related to water stress. Sometimes nitrogen use can induce water stress and was blamed for the disease. Wheat varieties vary in their susceptibility to the disease. The disease can be controlled by minimizing pathogen population increases and by reducing or delaying water stress. Oats should be avoided since they are an excellent host for the disease. Actions to improve water infiltration and storage reduce the chance of water stress. By maintaining residue on the surface, airborne saprophytic fungi will colonize it and prevent Fusarium from doing so. N applications should be based on realistic yields so water stress will not be induced. September seeding, rather than August, avoids excessive foliar growth which can induce water stress.

11067. Cook, R.J. and J.T. Waldher. 1977. Influence of stubble-mulch residue management on Cercosporella foot rot and yields of winter wheat.. Plant Disease Reporter 61:96-100.
The stubble-mulch method of residue management at Pullman, WA, did not favor more Cercosporella foot rot than the moldboard plow method. Foot rot was generally less severe on wheat in stubble-mulched plots, apparently because of poorer wheat growth already in early fall. This poorer wheat growth in certain years was not corrected by benomyl application. In general, Cercosporella severity was directly proportional to plant size and vigor in the fall, regardless of tillage method.

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