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Thursday, October 18, 2018

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826. Bezdicek, D. and R. Lockerman. no date. Crop rotation and the response of cereal crops to nitrogen in the PNW. unpublished.
Experiments conducted at Pullman, WA and Bozeman, MT. Year 1 - legumes (rainfall -Pullman 500 mm, Bozeman 480 mm). Year 2 -Pullman winter wheat + N (rainfall 350 mm); Bozeman barley + N (rainfall 200 mm). Compared fababean, pea, lentil, chickpea, fallow at both locations. Pullman legumes were used as green manure, Bozeman legumes were harvested for seed. N fertilizer equivalents ranged from 30-86 kg/ha N at Pullman (fallow = 125) and from 27-81 kg/ha N at Bozeman (fallow = 53). All cereals responded to added N, although less so at Pullman. More N was removed in seed than was fixed. Seed legumes appeared to fix 50-100 kg/ha N. The rotation effect was more significant at Pullman. T: cereal yields; fertilizer N equivalent; moisture depletion.

1165. Campbell, C.A., D.W.L. Read, R.P. Zentner, A.J. Leyshon, and W.S. Fer. 1983. First 12 years of a long-term crop rotation study in southwestern Saskatchewan.. Can. J. Plant Sci., 63:91-108.
On a crop-year basis, continuous wheat yields averaged 75% of fallow yields when recommended rates on N and P fertilizers were applied. Yield variability was lower for rotations that included high proportions of fallow than for continuous-type rotations. Fertilizer N applied at recommended rates increased yields of wheat grown on fallow by an average 5% and wheat grown on stubble by an average 7%. Application of P fertilizer at recommended rates increased yields of wheat grown on fallow and stubble by an average 12%. Total wheat production (kg/ha/yr) was inversely related to the frequency of fallow in the rotation. Continuous wheat (N and P applied) outproduced wheat grown on fallow in the 2-yr rotation by 53% over the 12-yr period.

1172. Campbell, C.A., K. Bowren, G. LaFond, H. Janzen, and R.P. Zentner. 1989. Effect of crop rotations on soi organic matter in two black chernozems.. Soil and Crop Workshop, Univ. Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Feb. 1989.

1180. Campbell, C.A., R.P. Zentner and P.J. Johnson. 1988. Effect of crop rotation and fertilization on the quantitative relationship between spring wheat yields, available soil moisture, and precipitation.. Canadian J. Soil Sci., 68(1):1-16.
The effects of crop rotation and fertilization on the quantitative relationship between spring wheat yields, available soil moisture, and growing season precipitation were determined. Stubble-seeded wheat required 68 mm of moisture to produce the first kilogram per hectare of grain; fallow-seeded wheat required about 46mm. The lower threshold level of MU for grain production decreased from about 140mm to the values cited above; this has resulted in substantially greater moisture use efficiency in recent years likely due to better, more timely crop mangement and the improved cereal varieties.

2735. Horner, G.M., M.M. Oveson, G.O. Baker, and W.W. Pawson.. 1960. Effect of cropping practices on yield, soil organic matter and erosion in the Pacific Northwest wheat region.. PNW Technical bulletin 1; USDA-ARS and Ag. Expt. Sta.'s of ID, OR, WA.
Summary of soil management experiments conducted over 40 yrs at six experiment stations. Covers: crop rotation, fertilization, and use of organic material. Some results: sweetclover and alfalfa were more effective than other legumes in increasing wheat yield. Yields of wheat were markedly affected by the sequences of cropping. Return of straw to soil decreased yields slightly under low N conditions. Organic and mineral N had no effect on yields in low precip. zones. Also covers runoff and erosion. T: many, eg.: effect of crop rotations on crop yield; crop yield as affected by grass/clover; effect of OM on wheat yield.

2756. Huggins, D.R., W.L. Pan, and J.L. Smith. 1989. Improving yield, percent protein, and N use efficiency of no-till hard red spring wheat through crop rotation and fall N fertilization.. Proceedings, 40th Far West Fertilizer Conference,.
In a field experiment near Pullman, WA, all fall and split fall-spring N applications significantly increased percent protein and N uptake efficiency as compared to all spring applications, while yields were unaffected. Protein increase was attributed to enhanced late season uptake, due to better positional availability of deep soil N. In another experiment, yield of hard red spring wheat was 10% greater when no-tilled into Austrian winter pea stubble (for seed) as compared to winter wheat stubble, while grain N and percent protein were not affected. The difference in yield was not eliminated by optimized N rates, indicating other rotation effects.

2809. Hume, L.. 1982. The long-term effects of fertilizer application and three rotations on weed communities in wheat.. Can. J. Plant Sci., 62:741-750.
The effect of fertilizer application and three rotations (continuous cropping, fallow-wheat, and fallow-wheat-wheat rotations)on the species composition of the weed community was examined using rotations that had been running for 21-22 yrs. Fertilizer application tended to reduce community differences between continuous cropping and short-term wheat-fallow rotations. With the use of 2- or 3-yr wheat-fallow rotations and herbicide application, weed problems can be minimized in southeastern Saskatchewan.

3098. Swanson, Guy. 1990. Annual production of spring wheat in Montana and the Columbia Basin. Bumper Times special edition, Jan. 31, 1990; p. 6; S. 4305 University Rd., Spokane, WA 99206.
Minimum till continuous spring wheat produced the highest net returns in a Montana study. The cost of Roundup reduced net returns in no-till, although no-till had the highest gross returns. John Rae, a WA farmer, has compared continuous no-till spring wheat with his normal winter wheat-fallow system. The continuous system has produced $350/ac more gross returns over five years in his 9" rainfall area.

7733. Young, D.L. and W. Goldstein. 1988. How government farm programs discourage sustainable cropping systems: a U.S. case study.. How systems work: Proc. Farming Systems Research Symp. 1987.
Compares enterprise budgets for wheat production in the Palouse of a conventional systems using normal fertilizers and pesticides with a PALS rotation using black medic and limited pesticides. Costs per acre were $130 for conventional and $57 for PALS, with net returns higher for PALS under all scenarios except a high yield site with government price supports. PALS became more profitable than conventional with wheat at $3.50/bu for a high yield site and at $5.00/bu for a low yield site.

7753. Young, Frank. 1989. Integrated pest management project update.. Paper presented at WA state weed conference, Nov. 13,1989.
This paper briefly describes the IPM weed study underway near Pullman, WA. This experiment uses field size plots for several rotation, tillage, and weed control treatments. Four years of research have been completed. Generally, the yield of spring cereals has not been affected by either weed management levels or tillage systems. Yields of spring peas were 17% greater with maximum weed management compared to the minimum level. Only three of the minimum tillage systems left sufficient residue cover to meet the 30% SCS requirement. However, all reduced tillage systems left more than 30% residue during the critical winter months. Yields of peas under conservation tillage were 13% greater than with conventional tillage, indicating the ability to reduce erosion potential with this crop and not suffer a yield penalty. No-till seeding has been successful either after spring wheat or spring peas, but not after the high residue of winter wheat.

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