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Friday, December 14, 2018

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5362. Power, J.F. (ed.). 1987. The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems.. Soil Cons. Soc. Amer., Ankeny, IA. 153 pp..
Proceedings of a national conference, University of Georgia, Athens, April 27-29, 1987. Excellent reference for the use of legumes in cropping systems and their compatibility with conservation tillage. Major sections include: the need; germplasm resources; nitrogen source; insects and diseases; cropping practices; weed control; erosion and productivity; economics.

1819. Elliott, L.F. (ed.). 1987. STEEP - Conservation concepts and accomplishments.. Washington State Univ. Publ., 662pp..
A compilation of 48 papers covering: tillage and plant maagement; erosion and runoff predictions; plant design; pest management; socio-economic; integrated systems; technology transfer for cropping systems; 22 technical notes. T: many

6583. USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1974. Soil conditioning rating indices for major irrigated and non-irrigated crops grown in the Western U.S.. Conservation Agronomy Technical Note No. 27.
This document presents a rating system to judge how various cropping systems affect soil condition over time. It assigns numerical values to various practices and totals them over a rotational sequence, with either a +, -, or neutral outcome. It is not a method for determining erosion. The concepts presented are helpful in assessing "soil quality" for cropping systems, both irrigated and dryland.

7242. Veseth, R.. 1989. Reduced tillage for green manure legumes. STEEP Conservation Farming Update, Summer 1989, p. 3-5.
Three tillages were compared for incorporating Austrian winter pea or red clover green manure: moldboard plow plus shallow disk; shallow disk twice; no-till. At each N fertilizer rate, winter wheat yields were slightly higher with reduced tillage than with conventional tillage. A 60 lb/ac N rate substantially increased wheat yields after green manure, while the 120 N rate gave little or no yield increase. With no N fertilizer, the yield of winter wheat after both green manure crops compared favorably with yield of no-till winter wheat after a seed crop of spring peas. Legume N uptake by a following wheat crop was not affected by residue treatment, but recovery of legume N from the soil was about 10% lower with surface application than with soil incorporation. Also, wheat yields after chemically-killed green manures were consistently lower, and could not be fully recovered with fertilizer N. The mechanism of this suppression is not known.

7693. Yan, Ying. 1989. A model for predicting soil loss ratio and crop production in eastern Washington. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils, WSU, Pullman, WA.
The model (SHUI) predicts soil erosion and crop production under different crop rotation, tillage operation, and crop residue management conditions. It simulates the soil-water budget, crop and root growth, top dry matter production, grain yield, and residue production and loss, and predicts the soil loss ratio. Validation data are included.

8374. Peterson, G.A., E. McGee, D.G. Westfall, C.W. Wood, and L. Sherrod. 1990. Crop and soil management in dryland agroecosystems.. Technical Bull. TB90-1, Dept. of Agronomy, Colorado St. Univ., Fort Collins, CO.
A large-scale field experiment was established in 1985 at 3 eastern CO locations to examine alternatives to the traditional wheat-fallow cropping system. All new treatments used no-till instead of tillage intensive management. Rotations include wheat-fallow, wheat-corn-fallow, wheat-corn-millet-fallow, and perennial grass. After five years, the more intensive cropping was giving greater grain output, nitrogen use efficiency, and water use efficiency than the wheat-fallow system. Organic matter levels also appear to be increasing. The research is also examining each strip plot at three landscape positions: toeslope, sideslope, and summit.

9493. Peterson, G.A., D.G. Wood, and C.W. Wood. 1989. Crop and soil management in dryland agroecosystems.. Technical Bulletin TB893, Dept. of Agronomy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO..
The general objective of the project is to identify dryland crop and soil management systems which will maximize water use efficiency of the total annual precipitation. Specific objectives: 1. Determine if cropping sequences with fewer and/or shorter summer fallow periods are feasible. 2. Quantify the relationship of climate (precipitation and evaporative demand), soil type and cropping sequences that involve fewer and/or shorter fallow periods. 3. Quantify the effects of long-term use of no-till managemment systems on soil structural stability, microorganisms and faunal populations of the soil and the organic N and P content of the soil, all in conjunction with various crop sequences. 4. Identify cropping or management systems that will minimize soil erosion by crop residue maintenance. 5. Develop a data base across climatic zones that will allow economic assessment of entire management systems.

9962. Chilcott, E.C.. 1910. A study of cultivation methods and crop rotations for the Great Plains area.. USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Bulletin 187. 78 pp..
This paper reports the results of a four-year experiment in crop rotation and cultivation methods conducted at eleven stations in the Great Plains area. Some of the questions asked of this experiment were how can the largest average yields of corn, spring wheat, oats and barley be obtained, do moisture conservation methods pay where continuous cropping to the same crop is practiced, and can green manuring be profitably substituted for summer tillage? The results found that a 3-year rotation of corn, wheat and oats gave the most profitable returns. Continous cropping with moisture conservation methods of fall plowing and fall, winter and spring tillage did not give results to warrant its recommendation. The most highly recommended practice was that of green manuring. For greatest benefits to the soil, it was recommended to plow in a green manure crop in early season, with little summer tillage, until wheat planting time.

11204. Matheson, N., B. Rusmore, J.R. Sims, M. Spengler, and E.L. Michalson. 1991. Cereal-legume cropping systems: nine farm case studies in the dryland northern plains, Canadian prairies, and intermountain Northwest.. AERO, 44 N. Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59601.
The farm case studies presented in this book include details of the crop rotations, tillage, fertilization, and pest control practices used by the farms. Farms were chosen for their innovative or alternative practices. Partial budgets for each crop on each farm are presented to provide a reference point for the economic performance of alternative dryland cropping systems. Comparisons with more conventional systems are not made.

11308. Coutts, G.R. and R.K. Smith. 1991. Zero Tillage Production Manual.. Manitoba-North Dakota Zero Tillage Farmers Association, Brandon, Manitoba.
The manual contains a mix of research results and grower experience with no-till management in the Northern Plains. A calendar of operations is included. In a four-year Manitoba study, average net returns per acre for no-till and minimum till were 130% and 77% higher, respectively, compared to conventional tillage.

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