WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Saturday, June 23, 2018

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Search results on 06/23/18

2249. Granatstein, D., D. Bezdicek, L. Elliott, V. Cochran, and J. Hammel. 1987. Long-term tillage and rotation effects on soil microbial biomass, carbon, and nitrogen.. Biol. Fertil. Soils 5:265-270..
This research examined plots that had been under different tillage and rotational management for 12 years. Rotations were WP (winter wheat-spring pea); WBP (winter wheat-spring barley-spring pea); WPA (winter wheat-spring pea undersown with red clover and alfalfa)-clover/alfalfa GM). The two tillages studied were moldboard plowing and no-till. There was little difference in microbial biomass, C or N below 5 cm in the no-till, with surface values being highest. Few differences due to rotation could be detected. The WPA rotation had the highest total C and N. Microbial biomass was higher in no-till surface soils where the preceding crop had provided high residue, while the opposite was true for tilled plots. Microbial biomass levels changed little from April to September, and then jumped higher in October with the advent of moisture.

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