WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

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3098. Swanson, Guy. 1990. Annual production of spring wheat in Montana and the Columbia Basin. Bumper Times special edition, Jan. 31, 1990; p. 6; S. 4305 University Rd., Spokane, WA 99206.
Minimum till continuous spring wheat produced the highest net returns in a Montana study. The cost of Roundup reduced net returns in no-till, although no-till had the highest gross returns. John Rae, a WA farmer, has compared continuous no-till spring wheat with his normal winter wheat-fallow system. The continuous system has produced $350/ac more gross returns over five years in his 9" rainfall area.

11037. Anon.. 1990. Annual production of spring wheat in Montana and the Columbia Basin.. Bumper Times Special Report, Spokane, WA. 1/31/90, p. 6..
In Montana, annual minimum till spring wheat produced the highest net returns compared to other summer fallow and winter wheat/spring wheat rotations. No-till continuous wheat produced the highest gross returns, but chemical costs reduced net returns. A farmer near Walla Walla, WA, had compared annual spring wheat to winter wheat-fallow. The annual system grossed $350/ac more than the crop-fallow system over five years. In the annual system, fields are swept after harvest and rodweeded in the fall to avoid the "green bridge." Fields are sprayed with Roundup and seeded to spring wheat as early as possible using a no-till drill. This often is in February. Average rainfall is 9".

11308. Coutts, G.R. and R.K. Smith. 1991. Zero Tillage Production Manual.. Manitoba-North Dakota Zero Tillage Farmers Association, Brandon, Manitoba.
The manual contains a mix of research results and grower experience with no-till management in the Northern Plains. A calendar of operations is included. In a four-year Manitoba study, average net returns per acre for no-till and minimum till were 130% and 77% higher, respectively, compared to conventional tillage.

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