WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Organic & Integrated Tree Fruit Production

Friday, April 20, 2018

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1819. Elliott, L.F. (ed.). 1987. STEEP - Conservation concepts and accomplishments.. Washington State Univ. Publ., 662pp..
A compilation of 48 papers covering: tillage and plant maagement; erosion and runoff predictions; plant design; pest management; socio-economic; integrated systems; technology transfer for cropping systems; 22 technical notes. T: many

5585. Ramig, R.E. and L.G. Ekin. 1987. Fallow systems for semiarid eastern Oregon and Washington.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 797, p.34.

6684. Stephens, D.E.. 1944. Effect of tillage and cropping practices on runoff, erosion, and crop yields in the wheat growing areas of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon.. USDA-SCS. Conservation practices on wheat lands of the Pacific Northwest..
An excellent summary of the dryland experiment station research in WA, ID and OR. Describes research on stubble mulching, tillage implements, crop rotations, fallow, etc. The use of sweetclover or alfalfa-grass were encouraged. T: yield, runoff, soil loss by tillage, rotation, fertilizer.

6821. Thom, C.C. and H.F. Holtz. 1915. Time and method of tillage on yield and comparative cost of production.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Bull. #123.
Evaluates: corn and wheat alternatiing, fall plowing. Peas and wheat alternating, fall plowing. Wheat and summer fallow, fall plowing. Wheat and summer fallow, spring plowing, packed and not packed. Wheat and volunteer pasture, fall plowing. Wheat and summer fallow, late spring plowing, packed and not packed. Wheat and summer fallow, early spring disking, late spring plowing. Wheat and summer fallow, fall disking, late spring plowing. Wheat and summer fallow, fall plowing, late spring disking. The most profitable operation was corn and wheat. T: comparison of plot treatments with yield, cost, return, and net profit.

7242. Veseth, R.. 1989. Reduced tillage for green manure legumes. STEEP Conservation Farming Update, Summer 1989, p. 3-5.
Three tillages were compared for incorporating Austrian winter pea or red clover green manure: moldboard plow plus shallow disk; shallow disk twice; no-till. At each N fertilizer rate, winter wheat yields were slightly higher with reduced tillage than with conventional tillage. A 60 lb/ac N rate substantially increased wheat yields after green manure, while the 120 N rate gave little or no yield increase. With no N fertilizer, the yield of winter wheat after both green manure crops compared favorably with yield of no-till winter wheat after a seed crop of spring peas. Legume N uptake by a following wheat crop was not affected by residue treatment, but recovery of legume N from the soil was about 10% lower with surface application than with soil incorporation. Also, wheat yields after chemically-killed green manures were consistently lower, and could not be fully recovered with fertilizer N. The mechanism of this suppression is not known.

7693. Yan, Ying. 1989. A model for predicting soil loss ratio and crop production in eastern Washington. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils, WSU, Pullman, WA.
The model (SHUI) predicts soil erosion and crop production under different crop rotation, tillage operation, and crop residue management conditions. It simulates the soil-water budget, crop and root growth, top dry matter production, grain yield, and residue production and loss, and predicts the soil loss ratio. Validation data are included.

7753. Young, Frank. 1989. Integrated pest management project update.. Paper presented at WA state weed conference, Nov. 13,1989.
This paper briefly describes the IPM weed study underway near Pullman, WA. This experiment uses field size plots for several rotation, tillage, and weed control treatments. Four years of research have been completed. Generally, the yield of spring cereals has not been affected by either weed management levels or tillage systems. Yields of spring peas were 17% greater with maximum weed management compared to the minimum level. Only three of the minimum tillage systems left sufficient residue cover to meet the 30% SCS requirement. However, all reduced tillage systems left more than 30% residue during the critical winter months. Yields of peas under conservation tillage were 13% greater than with conventional tillage, indicating the ability to reduce erosion potential with this crop and not suffer a yield penalty. No-till seeding has been successful either after spring wheat or spring peas, but not after the high residue of winter wheat.

8608. Young, F.L.. 1990. IPM systems research.. unpublished handout from USDA-ARS Weed Research Unit, Pullman, WA 99164.
The IPM Weeds study near Pullman, WA uses two 3-yr crop rotations, two tillage systems, and three weed management (herbicide) levels. Spring pea average yields after 3 yr were higher with chisel plow than with moldboard plow, slightly responsive to increased weed management level, and highest with maximum weed management/chisel plow combination.

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