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Thursday, January 18, 2018

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765. Benson, V., W. Goldstein, D. Young, J. Williams, and C. Jones. 1988. Impacts of cropping practices on nitrogen use and movement.. Proc. Intl. Conf. on Dryland Farming.
Conventional and PALS practices were used as inputs for the EPIC model to simulate the effects of the systems over 108 years on an Athena soil. Total erosion over 108 yr under PALS was 40% less than the conventional system. Nitrogen loss through water was 25% less under PALS than conventional. Percolation loss of N was zero for both systems. Neither system had significant increase or decrease in yields after 108 yr of erosion.

6329. Slinkard, A., V. Biederbeck, L. Bailey, P. Olson, W. Rice, and L. Townley-Smith. 1987. Annual legumes as a fallow substitute in the northern Great Plains of Canada.. IN: J.F. Power (ed.). The role of legumes in conservation tillage systems. p. 6-7..
Tested tangier flatpea, indianhead lentil, fababean, field pea, and Austrain winter pea at several locations. Data suggest that annual legume green manures contributed about 40 lb N/ac, and increased wheat yields more than the addition of 54 lb N fertilizer on wheat stubble. Moisture greatly affected yield after legumes. Choice of annual legume depends on relative seed cost. Suggest indianhead lentil as most promising species. The value of the N it fixes comes close to the seed cost. Three management systems are proposed.

7028. USDA Soil Conservation Service. 1955. Joint Utah - Idaho Conservation Dryland Farming Guide.. .
Describes 3 basic rotations for the region: 1) grass/alfalfa - no more than 2 yr grain (Class IV land, precip. >17"); 2) grain - fallow - various rotations with alfalfa/grass or sweetclover depending on precip. (12-17"); 3) permanent grass/legume, with no more than 2 yr grain (precip 9-12", Class IV land); lists adapted grass and legume varieties; describes use of rotary hoe and skew treader for weed control. T: grass varieties.

7693. Yan, Ying. 1989. A model for predicting soil loss ratio and crop production in eastern Washington. M.S. Thesis, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils, WSU, Pullman, WA.
The model (SHUI) predicts soil erosion and crop production under different crop rotation, tillage operation, and crop residue management conditions. It simulates the soil-water budget, crop and root growth, top dry matter production, grain yield, and residue production and loss, and predicts the soil loss ratio. Validation data are included.

8697. Kresge, D.O. and A.D. Halvorson. 1982. FLEXCROP: a dryland cropping system model.. USDA-ARS Agric. Prod. Res. Rept. 180.

9284. Bracken, A.F. and G. Stewart. 1930. A quarter century of dry farm eExperiments at Nephi, Utah.. Utah Agr. Expt. Sta. Bulletin 222, Logan, UT..
Dry farming began in Boxelder County in 1863 and has now extended to all parts of the state where precipitation and topography permit favorable development. Alternate cropping with fall or early spring planting is the general practice. On page 41, there is a summary of results covering the following subjects: weather, data, treatment of land before plowing, plowing, treatment of summer fallow seeding experiments, cropping experiments, cereal varieties, fertility experiments, and rotations.

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