2017 Crop Protection Guide for Tree Fruits in Washington

General Recommendations

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

General Recommendations

  1. Use of the Pest Control Program tables: Materials listed in the tables are not listed in order of preference. The listing of a pesticide or pesticides in the tables against a target pest at a given tree stage or timing does not imply that the application should automatically be made. On the contrary, the need to make an application should always be determined through sampling or monitoring the pest in question (see Pest Management below). Many pesticides have restrictions on the number of applications per season, the total pounds of active ingredient per season, or the interval between sprays. Multiple listings of a pesticide in the table do not imply that the pesticide may legally be used that number of times. Always carefully read and follow all use restrictions on the label. The Remarks column contains pertinent information regarding the proper use of one or more of the pesticides listed against that pest; however, no attempt has been made to list all of the restrictions on the label.  Check the label carefully to determine the amount of active ingredients of insecticides, fungicides or growth regulators per acre when you apply spray as concentrates or semi-concentrates. There are some exceptions, however, particularly in the area of growth regulators and spray oils. Always read the label carefully for exceptions.
  2. Proper pruning and spacing of trees is an aid in the control of many insects and diseases.
  3. Both proper timing of sprays and thorough coverage are essential for good control. Orchard operations differ with regard to equipment, spacing and size of trees, local weather conditions, and particular pest problems. The timing, concentration, and gallonage of spray per acre should vary accordingly.
  4. Due to the differences between districts, orchards, and even parts of the same orchard, a detailed spray program should be worked out for your orchard.
  5. Heavy, brief showers (0.3 inch in 15-30 minutes, for example) or lighter rain for a longer period (0.75 inch or more in 24 hours) or overtree irrigation for fruit cooling will remove pesticides from fruit and foliage surfaces. To protect crops from pests that require control over an extended period, such as codling moth and cherry fruit fly, it may be necessary to reapply a pesticide to maintain coverage. If you wish to reapply the same product, check the between-spray interval allowed on the label.
Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us