WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Areawide II Project

Sunday, May 28, 2017

 


Download the Project Peer Review (pdf)

Project Summary:

This program builds on the successful codling moth areawide management project (1995-1999) that reduced in-season organophosphate use in apples and pears by 75%. Project goals are to further reduce broad-spectrum pesticide use, expand the use of mating disruption in pome fruits and new cropping systems, and increase efficacy of biological control in orchards for secondary pests. Apple and pear production are at risk under the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) because these fruit comprise a significant fraction of the diets of infants and children.

 

The approach outlined in the objectives includes:

  • Establishment of large-scale sites to assess the replacement organophosphate and carbamate insecticides with new selective products.
  • Extension of pheromone-based management principles to new acreage, pests and crops.
  • Evaluation and improvement of non-pheromone monitoring systems to reduce risk.
  • Manipulation of the orchard and near-orchard habitats to improve efficacy of biocontrol of secondary pests.
  • Development of alternative methods for managing locally invasive secondary pests, such as true bugs.

     

    The project is multi-state, multi-institutional, and multi-disciplinary receiving funding from the Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems (IFAFS)and Risk Avoidance and Mitigation for Major Food Crop Systems (RAMP). The technologies being developed are equally appropriate for small, medium, and large-sized producers. Research and educational programs will significantly reduce use of broad-spectrum pesticides, increasing farm worker safety and reducing the risk of environmental contamination. It will also enhance biological control in orchards, establishing a low-cost renewable-resource-based management system that is sustainable. This project is expected to increase acreage under mating disruption, improve the program efficacy, and reduce costs to help US agriculture compete in a global economy.


    PI and co-PI names and addresses:

  • Jay F. Brunner, Washington State University, 1100 N. Western, Wenatchee, WA 98801
  • Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, 1100 N. Western, Wenatchee, WA 98801
  • John Dunley, Washington State University, 1100 N. Western, Wenatchee, WA 98801
  • Vince Jones, Washington State University, 1100 N. Western, Wenatchee, WA 98801
  • John J. Brown, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164
  • John D. Stark, Washington State University, Puyallup, WA 98371
  • Helmut Riedl, Oregon State University, Mid-Columbia Experiment Station, Hood River, OR
  • Rick Hilton, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon Research & Extension Center, Medford, OR 97502
  • Philip VanBuskirk, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon Research & Extension Center, Medford, OR 97502
  • Peter J. Landolt, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA 98951
  • David R. Horton, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA 98951
  • Alan Knight, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA 98951
  • Thomas R. Unruh, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA 98951
  • Stephen C. Welter, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management , University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
  • Robert A. Van Steenwyk, Cooperative Extension Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
  • Doug Light, USDA-ARS, Plant Protection Research Unit, Albany, CA 94710-1105
  • Nicholas J. Mills, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
  • Jocelyn G. Millar, Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521
  • Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, 1100 N Western Ave, Washington State University, Wenatchee WA 98801, 509-663-8181, Contact Us